#1
I've been recording the first serious song of my band and I am recording first (guitar) because I have the home studio and the song is based around guitar.

Anyway I've been recording it and I haven't been using a metronome. This is mostly because there are lots of tempo changes and I didn't want to have to figure all that out. Will it be too hard to record all the other instruments if I did the guitar track without any metronome? I'm worried it might be

That brings me to the probably more important aspect to this thread, what's the best way to record with a metronome? I am using a Pod for guitar and have the headphones on to listen to it. I might try using my physical metronome and turn it up really loud and hopefully I can hear that. Then I would just do each part piece by piece because of the tempo changes. What methods do you guys use?
Last edited by Tmusician at Jul 5, 2011,
#2
create and setup a click trackt hat matches all of the tempo changes of ur song....then use that as a track in your recording software if it doesnt already have that feature....

also, weather you record with or without a metronome, its almost always better to do drums first. That way there is a beat for everyone else to follow.
#3
Normally you can edit the tempo in various points of the song in your recording program by selecting the bar you want the tempo to change, then something along the lines of Insert>>Tempo Change
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#4
I typically build click tracks with Guitar Pro 6. I use the wood block model. High for the first beat of each measure; low for the rest. You can change the tempo at will, and even put triplets, etc. in there. Basically it's easy to do whatever you want with it; then you can export it to a .wav or .mid and import it into your recording software.

My mixer has 2 buses, so if we're recording with mics, we run the click through the sub bus and route it to come through headphones only (we use a "Y" cable to share the click) so you can't hear it in the recording. If you don't have a mixer, you can run the click on one computer, then record through another. But there's all sorts of ways to do this with most recording software, even if you don't have a mixer, just by manipulating the mute and monitor controls on your computer.
#5
Quote by GAbrandonGER
create and setup a click trackt hat matches all of the tempo changes of ur song....then use that as a track in your recording software if it doesnt already have that feature....

also, weather you record with or without a metronome, its almost always better to do drums first. That way there is a beat for everyone else to follow.


I always heard that recording drums first but then the drummer says he needs something to follow along to, so I have to make a recording, and thus I'm doing guitar first! Do pro drummers just memorize a song and can just play the drum part without listening to anything, just from memory?
#6
Quote by Tmusician
I always heard that recording drums first but then the drummer says he needs something to follow along to, so I have to make a recording, and thus I'm doing guitar first! Do pro drummers just memorize a song and can just play the drum part without listening to anything, just from memory?

It's not too hard to memorise a song...

But anyway, 'pro drummers' typically play to a click track, while rest of band play along in another room (or that without a click for looser genres) or at least to demo'd guitars done to a click, with the click playing too.

Main reason for this is to keep the emotion/'feel' of the song, while keeping it to a strict tempo.
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