#1
I've just got done reading Tom's mode articles in the columns section of the site, (called the modal approach or something similar) and I decided to try writing something using accidentals to suggest modal play.

What I came up with was a basic I - bVII chord progression. So the only accidental I'm using is a b7, which (correct me if I'm wrong..) suggests the mixolydian mode. Looking at the mixolydian mode, some other chords that could be used to suggest the mixolydian mode are: the v chord (instead of V), and the iii* chord (instead of iii).

So my question I guess is if my progression uses only chords from the mixolydian mode, and the progression feels like it resolves to the I (rather than relative major/minor key), is my progression modal? Or is it still tonal but suggesting mixolydian?
#2
Quote by ibz120
I've just got done reading Tom's mode articles in the columns section of the site, (called the modal approach or something similar) and I decided to try writing something using accidentals to suggest modal play.

What I came up with was a basic I - bVII chord progression. So the only accidental I'm using is a b7, which (correct me if I'm wrong..) suggests the mixolydian mode. Looking at the mixolydian mode, some other chords that could be used to suggest the mixolydian mode are: the v chord (instead of V), and the iii* chord (instead of iii).

So my question I guess is if my progression uses only chords from the mixolydian mode, and the progression feels like it resolves to the I (rather than relative major/minor key), is my progression modal? Or is it still tonal but suggesting mixolydian?

With modal music, its harder, at least now a days, to achieve a total modal feeling, at least from what I have seen. Using an extensive progression can help hint at the relative major or minor scales. In my opinion, you'd be best off using a drone, or just a static chord. Say you want C mixo, drone C, or I'd use a C7sus4. Even just using those however, cannot achieve modal feel. To be completely honest, I'm not very knowledgable in how to get this feel, but I can guide towards it. I hope this kind of helped
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#3
Quote by ibz120
some other chords that could be used to suggest the mixolydian mode are: the v chord (instead of V)


An issue I have with this (playing through the progression) is:

Chord progression: A - G - Em

It seems like it would be an IV - III - i progression in E minor.
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#4
Quote by ibz120
I've just got done reading Tom's mode articles in the columns section of the site, (called the modal approach or something similar) and I decided to try writing something using accidentals to suggest modal play.

What I came up with was a basic I - bVII chord progression. So the only accidental I'm using is a b7, which (correct me if I'm wrong..) suggests the mixolydian mode. Looking at the mixolydian mode, some other chords that could be used to suggest the mixolydian mode are: the v chord (instead of V), and the iii* chord (instead of iii).

So my question I guess is if my progression uses only chords from the mixolydian mode, and the progression feels like it resolves to the I (rather than relative major/minor key), is my progression modal? Or is it still tonal but suggesting mixolydian?


I don't know who Tom is.

If you play I - bVII is a Major key using a borrowed chord from the Parallel Minor Key. Nothing modal about it. It's just there are a lot of incorrect articles and assumptions about Modes out there, and almost all of them are wrong.

Best,

Sean
#5
Quote by Sean0913
I don't know who Tom is.

If you play I - bVII is a Major key using a borrowed chord from the Parallel Minor Key. Nothing modal about it. It's just there are a lot of incorrect articles and assumptions about Modes out there, and almost all of them are wrong.

Best,

Sean


Right you are. If this is the same article I'm thinking of, then it contains some good information about suggestive play (which is generally the farthest modal concepts will be taken nowadays,) this is just a bad example since it is so easily explained away by a common borrowed chord.
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