#1
I've barely scratched the surface of neoclassical music, but I need some help. With neoclassical metal/rock, guys like Yngwie Malmsteen, Jeff Loomis, etc, when people describe their music as neoclassical, how is this so? How do you write music that'd be described as neoclassical on an electric guitar? Is it the song structure, harmonies, general vibe? I really don't understand that, and I'd like to, so please help?
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How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

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#3
Well the prefix neo- means new so i would assume it means literally 'new classical' music... i think
Last edited by greeneyegat at Jul 7, 2011,
#4
Ok, first thing. Neo basically means 'New'. Classical refers to classical music. So Neoclassical means 'New Classical'.

The way people sound 'classical' is to adapt various patterns and techniques from classical music. Yngwie listened to lots of Bach, Tcharkofsky, Pagannini and Vivaldi and built his playing around those composers. He mixed metal and hard rock (Deep Purple, Jimi Hendrix, Van Halen, etc.) with his classical influences and developed his own style.

The best way to play neo-classical is to listen to and play classical music and then adapt metal around those techniques.

A few good ones to start with are Rondo Alla Turka by Mozart, Vivaldi's summer and spring, and Beethoven's 9th.

After you listen and learn some classical, start writing your own. It pays off to be able to play a variety of metal and this is a tricky genre to get down so good luck!!!
#5
Loomis...neoclassical? Wat.

If you're wondering what makes neoclassical what it is, listen to more Malmsteen and Symphony X. If you're still wondering, more neoclassical listening. Prob solved
modes are a social construct
#6
Imagine Baroque era music done on an electric guitar. That's pretty much it.

I find it a bit boring now, to be honest. I'd much rather prefer some Romantic or 20th Century style music done in a metal setting.
#7
One criterion is that it must give you a headache after 10 minutes of listening. If it doesn't it isn't neoclassical.
#8
Neoclassical, hardly.

Neoclassical music takes stylistic features of the classical period and fuses them in a modern style. Not playing Vivaldi/Bach licks.

Fast minor scales/pedal notes/arpeggios =/= Classical period.
#10
Quote by griffRG7321
Neoclassical, hardly.

Neoclassical music takes stylistic features of the classical period and fuses them in a modern style. Not playing Vivaldi/Bach licks.

Fast minor scales/pedal notes/arpeggios =/= Classical period.


classical music=/= Classical period

notice how one letter is capitalised, other isnt
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#11
Quote by hr113
classical music=/= Classical period

notice how one letter is capitalised, other isnt


I'm aware of the difference, Neoclassical music however, is referring to Classical music. NeoBaroque can be applied to music which draws from Baroque music.
#12
It depends how you're taking it.

Like most things in music, the genre "Neo-Classical" is open to interpretation.

The most popular opinion on the term seems to be the idea that Neo-Classical is (what an average person would view as) "classical music" but modernised.
Despite not necessarily being music/ideas from the Classical period modernised.
A lot of Yngwie Malmsteen's music seems a lot more in the style of Baroque. (Well he has a song called "Baroque and Roll" which kinda gives that one away! )

Anyway, the other way to interpret the term (though there are probably more) would be the literal idea that it is "New Classical" which would assume that the music follows conventions of the Classical period.


Then again I don't know a lot about music pre-1920s except for what I did in school and a bit of outside reading, so I may be a bit wrong with this stuff!
#13
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Imagine Baroque era music done on an electric guitar. That's pretty much it.

I find it a bit boring now, to be honest. I'd much rather prefer some Romantic or 20th Century style music done in a metal setting.


Neo-Romantic. Now that would be something to listen to. I get what people are saying, Neo-Classical/Neo-Baroque/Neo-Romantic etc. I'll just listen to a lot of music from those periods and try to work patterns or structures into my own playing.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#14
Quote by hr113
classical music=/= Classical period

notice how one letter is capitalised, other isnt


and? as griff said, this refers to new music of the classical period, not all classical music. i never heard much of it i liked.

the only properly good neo classical stuff was stravinksy anyway...
#17
Quote by thePTOD
I've barely scratched the surface of neoclassical music, but I need some help. With neoclassical metal/rock, guys like Yngwie Malmsteen, Jeff Loomis, etc, when people describe their music as neoclassical, how is this so? How do you write music that'd be described as neoclassical on an electric guitar? Is it the song structure, harmonies, general vibe? I really don't understand that, and I'd like to, so please help?


Well, it's a marketing term. It sounds highbrow, which attracts a certain crowd.

If you want to learn to write in a particular style, you should first spend time playing music of that style on your guitar. Use whatever theory knowledge you have to analyze/make sense of it.
When you have enough experience playing the music, you won't have to ask " how do I write in that style?"...... because you will know.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 7, 2011,
#18
well generally alot of the neoclassical music you hear is often based on the Baroque period of time so its a bit of a misnomer, but generally its music that uses the same key and phrasing techniques of the classical music of the time (or any time for that matter)
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