#1
I've browsed the lessons section and also read the technique section on here, but I was wanting something a little more...tangible? I don't know I feel I can concentrate and focus more when reading from paper than on a screen.

books, dvds, either or. My focus is more on a metal type style playing, particularly death metal. I have a good book on guitar theory but was wanting one on possibly advanced guitar technique (sweep picking, legato, etc. etc.)

I apologize if this is in the wrong section.
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#2
Quote by gravatrax
I've browsed the lessons section and also read the technique section on here, but I was wanting something a little more...tangible? I don't know I feel I can concentrate and focus more when reading from paper than on a screen.

books, dvds, either or. My focus is more on a metal type style playing, particularly death metal. I have a good book on guitar theory but was wanting one on possibly advanced guitar technique (sweep picking, legato, etc. etc.)

I apologize if this is in the wrong section.


You could always try printing the lessons or relevant bits of the thread of course...
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#3
This topic is recurring like every week or so now, isn't it?

Anyway I'll repost what I said in other threads like this.
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#4
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
You could always try printing the lessons or relevant bits of the thread of course...


I'd rather have something binded, easier to keep track of.


Quote by Shor

This topic is recurring like every week or so now, isn't it?

Anyway I'll repost what I said in other threads like this.
Creative Guitar 1&2 by Guthrie Govan...get them...get busy!


Ill be sure to check it out! But it seems its somewhat geared toward rock guitarists. I'm more worried about trying to increase speed, gain a broader knowledge of how to execute things such as tapping, sweeping, that kinda stuff. as well as become a more faster and efficient player.
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Last edited by gravatrax at Jul 7, 2011,
#5
Well, just to throw in some DVDs ive found useful.

Rock Dicipline with John petrucci ( dream theater ), is about proper warm up and alternate picking/sweeping legato etc exercises.

Creative fusion by Kiko luererio. (Rochhouse method DVD). deals with arpeggio concepts and following the chords. Can by used even in death metal (diminished).
#6
Yeah that's the kinda style I'm looking to play tech deathy stuff I suppose, but that's somewhat loosely defined genre. But I really like the classical feel of bands such Obscura, Spawn of Possession, and Necrophagist. Right now I'm sorta moving past the beginning phase of guitar playing, and am starting to dive into the world of musical theory as well as advanced playing (as noted)

The Creative Guitar series look okay but the review and summary of the book are somewhat vague on what it covers lol. John Petrucci aye? Not super familiar with his work but I at least know him by name. Is there a book to supplement the DVD?

I'll look into Creative fusion. the thing is, is that i don't like going out and spending money on theory books without first getting an idea wether or not I'd be satisfied. Because over time buying lots of books and stuff can add up, especially if said books sucks or just wasn't doing the trick.
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#7
Well if you want a small sample of both petrucci and the creative fusion stuff i´d link it now.

If you don´t know John Petrucci that well i suggest that you look into some of his riffs and solos, he is ranked as one of the top notch metal guitarists. He knew his theory from inside-outside. and he is one of the greatest alternate pickers i know of. Look at : Constant motion, As i am, A nightmare to remember, take the time. All by dream theater.

And yes, there is a book for rock dicipline. there is no "book" for the creative fusion, there is a DVD and a computer file with tabs and text about the different stuff he goes through.

Rock dicipline sneak peak : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrAaMLpP20k ( jump to 3:00 )

Part 2 : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEyMnbFdml4&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

Part 3 : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPE5courrwY&feature=related

And that is just the warm up section!

Creative fusion sneak peak : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XA9RVja0zGY ( some complicated shit right there! )

Hope that helped!
#8
Hey I noticed that you are into the work of Obscura, Necrophagist, etc., and most likely dig the way that Christian Muenzner plays. If so, here is this:

http://www.guitarchris.de/41292.html

It's full of different legato exercises that Christian wrote. I stumbled upon it one day. Though it isn't a book, it could be of help to you to see what he is doing to an extent. Just thought I'd pass it along. Hope it helps.
#9
Ill be sure to check it out! But it seems its somewhat geared toward rock guitarists. I'm more worried about trying to increase speed, gain a broader knowledge of how to execute things such as tapping, sweeping, that kinda stuff. as well as become a more faster and efficient player.


Well, they cover all that and a hell of a lot more.

Mind you, the main thread here and Jamey Andreas's "Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar" go into more detail on technical nuts and bolts of just "gaining speed" and "becoming more efficient".

You're already doing this, yeah? www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvhZ80OsuTQ

Prolly single most valuable exercise for efficiency.
#10
Hmmm thanks for all the links guys! I have been checking them out, also thanks for the link to Christian Muenzers page, hes a very talented guitarist. I will have to check out dream theater from what I demoed I think I like it quite a bit.

@Freepower Why yes I have seen that video. Very useful, I need to practice that a little more though, to maximize positive results.

One last things. I have been locked into a huge battle with a friend of mine. I told that I am going to restring and reset the neck on my guitar back to E standard. I just kinda figured it's one of those things like why make it harder on yourself?

When I got my ibanez we wasted no time in Drop C tuning that thing< I mean i still practice scales on it, but I still have to think about because I have to start from a different point on a fretboard other than whats noted on a tab that has the scale.

My friend thinks I am wasting my time and it's silly to learn how to play guitar in tunings you won't play in. As he right? Does it really matter? Or am the one playing smart? I'm just wondering it just seems like....common sense. Lol.

By the way the theory book I have is thre Hal Leonard Music Theory: Everything You Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask by Tom Kolb, it seems comprehensive, and fairly straightforward, 101 pages of nothing but applied guitar theory.
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#11
I have four main guitars in four different tunings. If you know what you're doing you soon get used to the differences between tunings and how to adjust scales and such. In fact I've often found it really helpful to move ideas across tunings - sometimes it's just a lot easier in a tuning you haven't tried yet.
#12
Troy Stetina's books are really good and many of them are geared toward metal players. I just posted in another thread that I've bought three of his books, and I think they're great for technique and theory.
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#13
Somewhat OT but when I do get more comfortable with how scale are formulated, and all those goodies I planned on (after I get a nice amp thinkintg about shooting for a 6505 or a 5150) getting a 7 string Ibanez and setting it up for A tuning for times when I wanna go heavy (like idk Nile heavy, not like Whitechapel heavy :P) and maybe even a PRS Torero and set that up for...gee idk maybe just drop C. The thought of down tuning a PRS though...idk........

Anyways where can I find Jeremy Andreas thingamajig? I am going to go back reread freepower things, very helpful guide by the way
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#15
Quote by Vecheka
Troy Stetina's books are really good and many of them are geared toward metal players. I just posted in another thread that I've bought three of his books, and I think they're great for technique and theory.


Two things I really like about his books:

(1) Structure. Each chapter of his method has a series of exercises followed by a longer piece of music that actually uses everything from the chapter.

(2) Mentality. He puts a heavy emphasis on teaching you to be methodical and thorough about every detail as you work your way up from the basics.

And don't miss out on "Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar", no matter what your skill level.
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#17
Thanks ill be sure to check both those out.

One last thing...and I am sorta embarrassed to admit, but I never really the hang with transition between chords on the guitar. I have most of the basic chords memorized, but when it comes to playing them theres always a long pause when switching up the fingering, and for the types of stuff I might do in the future, that probably won;t work out too well. Can anyone recommend exercises for that? Perhaps the finger independence thing free power had would...
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Russian Big Muff Pi
TC ELectronics Flashback Delay
#18
Well if you have difficulty switching between chords i´d say practice.

*Drum roll*

Switching chords!

I promise you, sit down for 10-20 min everyday and just switch between chords at the speed your able to. Soon it´ll become easier. As with everything else, practice makes perfect. (perfect practice makes perfect)