#1
Okay, so first off I'm just going to say that I have no experience with recording tracks except for some Audacity, but I can learn. That's not the point though. I was just wondering if anyone could help me find some good equipment that could record instruments for songs that my band would like to make.

We are a metal band. I need equipment that will allow us to record vocals (screaming), guitars, bass, and drums. Just some decent gear that will do it's job and nothing really fancy.

If anyone could point me in the right direction, that would be awesome .
#2
Buy a Line 6 GX and maybe the metalpack too, works awesome. Go listen to some tests on youtube. I can send you some good presets too, I'm such an expert <3<3<3<3
#3
First got to http://www.gearslutz.com and sign up for their forums. I learned how to record vox from the guy who records Cradle of Filth and Immolation.

Research exactly how each instrument is recorded and make wise, informed decisions about what to buy.

You'll need a basic interface and some software. If you want to multitrack you probably need something in the 8-channel range. At least for drums.

Stereo USB units go for about $100. The Alesis i02, certainly not a great unit, but useable, and possible to achieve a professional sound on, also comes with Cubase LE5.

LE5 should be good enough for you.

I personally hate Cubase, but you can't beat "free" (or at least bundled.) So pay for the gear and get the free, crappy, but useable software.

Next get some mics.

SM57 is absolutely necessary. You need this mic in your collection.

If music was carpentry, then the SM57 is a phillips-head screwdriver. It aint fancy, and it won't be the best mic in your collection, EVER, but at the same time you can't live without it.

A carpenter without a phillips driver is useless.

What do they cost, $0.50? Seriously.

You should also get a small diaphragm condenser. Start with one low-price one. I always say people can take that entry-level condenser and turn it into a room mic when they get better mics to replace it with.

How good does your room mic have to be? Seriously.

Or put it on snare bottom or something.

A $100 condenser won't hurt you.

As you build your collection you will find uses for the USB interface and cheaper mics you bought early on. That's the nice thing.

What's better, an AK47 or a revolver?

The AK, obviously, but you know what? Every soldier in the world who carries and AK and doesn't want to get his ass shot off close range carries a revolver.

Tried and true, works every time. Can't aim for shit, and you probably have to fire all six bullets at your target to kill the son of a bitch...

But it is reliable, and sometimes assault rifles jam up on you... or you just run out of bullets!

Weird analogy, but it works. Get your older-school, tried and true stuff (like a 57) first, and get nicer and nicer stuff to enhance your sound later.

It will take you a long time to build your collection. Good luck! And don't get your shit stolen at some bar!!!

"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#4
Do you have a budget? That will help us a lot. Also, are you ok with programing drums or do they HAVE to be live? If you're cool with programming, you'll get by with a lot less money.
#5
I'm the guitarist in TS's band, and I'm just as clueless as he is.

Quote by Bubonic Chronic
First got to http://www.gearslutz.com and sign up for their forums. I learned how to record vox from the guy who records Cradle of Filth and Immolation.

Will do.

Research exactly how each instrument is recorded and make wise, informed decisions about what to buy.

You'll need a basic interface and some software. If you want to multitrack you probably need something in the 8-channel range. At least for drums.

When recording guitar on my own, I mic up my amp with a SM57 and run it though a POD, used as a DI box. This is fine for guitar on it's own, and I assume it should be fine for vocals as well, especially since there are many mic modelers, including a talk box, microphone, reverb, etc. It may not be practical, and obviously a POD won't give you the most genuine tone, but I think it may work for a somewhat decent quality demo, no?

Stereo USB units go for about $100. The Alesis i02, certainly not a great unit, but useable, and possible to achieve a professional sound on, also comes with Cubase LE5.

LE5 should be good enough for you.

As mentioned before, I can use the POD, though we are definitely looking into a cheap interface we can all use. I think a cheap one may be fine, for it's mostly being used only as a signal processor, as the tone we want comes from the gear we have. Any additional tone-monkeying could be done in whatever software we use, I think.

I personally hate Cubase, but you can't beat "free" (or at least bundled.) So pay for the gear and get the free, crappy, but useable software.

As far as software is concerned, I honestly think we can manage ourselves with Reaper. Should we need something more extensive, a friend of ours (MIDI freak) could help us out, as I believe he can properly use the most popular softwares (whether it be Pro Tools, Cubase, whatever). IMO, Reaper is fine; do you think it may not be sufficient enough?

Next get some mics.

SM57 is absolutely necessary. You need this mic in your collection.

Got it

If music was carpentry, then the SM57 is a phillips-head screwdriver. It aint fancy, and it won't be the best mic in your collection, EVER, but at the same time you can't live without it.

A carpenter without a phillips driver is useless.

What do they cost, $0.50? Seriously.

You should also get a small diaphragm condenser. Start with one low-price one. I always say people can take that entry-level condenser and turn it into a room mic when they get better mics to replace it with.

The only condenser mic I have is a shitty, portable one that's meant for iPod recording. What is the importance of having a condenser mic? Should it be for vocals, acoustic, etc or will it be placed somewhere in the room, then added to the track to give it a larger sound?

How good does your room mic have to be? Seriously.

Or put it on snare bottom or something.

A $100 condenser won't hurt you.

As you build your collection you will find uses for the USB interface and cheaper mics you bought early on. That's the nice thing.

What's better, an AK47 or a revolver?

The AK, obviously, but you know what? Every soldier in the world who carries and AK and doesn't want to get his ass shot off close range carries a revolver.

Tried and true, works every time. Can't aim for shit, and you probably have to fire all six bullets at your target to kill the son of a bitch...

But it is reliable, and sometimes assault rifles jam up on you... or you just run out of bullets!

So where do the bazookas come in?

Weird analogy, but it works. Get your older-school, tried and true stuff (like a 57) first, and get nicer and nicer stuff to enhance your sound later.

It will take you a long time to build your collection. Good luck! And don't get your shit stolen at some bar!!!



Quote by sandyman323
Do you have a budget? That will help us a lot. Also, are you ok with programing drums or do they HAVE to be live? If you're cool with programming, you'll get by with a lot less money.


Realistically speaking, our drums would probably be MIDI based, either through use of VSTi's, FruityLoops, or (goddammit) GuitarPro. If we really want to record an actual acoustic drumset, I'd assume we'd buy some studio time.
R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio. Supplied amazing music to both me and my mother.

He will be missed.
Last edited by larrytheguitar at Jul 10, 2011,
#6
Reaper is free and therefore ideal. There aint really any major differences between Cubase, Logic, ProTools, Albeton, Reaper etc. it all depends what u prefere and r faster with! I use Cubase, Reason and Reaper at home and Logic and Pro Tools at uni, but I prefere Cubase to them all because its what im fasterest on.

SM57 essential basic equipment, although checkout the T-bone MB-75 for £28, its a SM57 rip-off. I once recorded Vox with SM57 and MB-75 next to each other and found literally no differnce!

www.thomann.de/gb/the_tbone_mb75.htm

Red5 Audio www.red5audio.com/ do some real good quality microphones, designed in Scotland built in China or summet to cut down on production costs, therefore quility designed mics at a cheap price, the RV4 is a good all round condenser at £56.17Including VAT at 20%.
www.red5audio.com/RV4SPEC.htm

and lol, I still use guitar pro to write my drums tracks, although now I got Addictive drums and EZdrummer I export the MIDI from guitar pro and import it into Cubase and run it through addictive drums or EZdrummer, depending on which gives me the right sound for the track.
Last edited by Nicotine667 at Jul 10, 2011,