#1
Hey y'all!

If I plug in my microphone into my Blues Jr, can I damage the amp ? I have a lot of feedback when I do that.

Thanks
#2
i don't think you'll harm anything, but as you notice it doesn't work too well. plus a guitar amp's speakers aren't the best for vocals. a 2-way or 3-way cab would work better because of crossovers and more focused freq response.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

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#3
hey thanks for the answers. What is a 2-way or 3way cab ?

Unfortunately I only have my guitar amp (blues jr) and a bass amp (warwick 60w)
#5
Quote by alans056
hey thanks for the answers. What is a 2-way or 3way cab ?




something with a speaker and a tweeter and a crossover to make sure the right device is getting the right frequency of signal. usually the speaker in these devices are full range.

Quote by winterXsolstice
the bass amp would be better


why is that?

the fundamental frequency for the 'bass' vocal range is ~80 hz to ~350 hz, which is roughly the range of a guitar and that is the lowest frequency vocal range. furthermore the low notes of the fundamental frequency won't be the ones we identify as the dominant sound of a human voice.

our ears will actually pick up the higher order harmonics, and more importantly, the formants that define the vowel sounds of singer. these frequencies will be ~300 hz to 2500 hz or so (which makes sense because that is where are ears are most sensitive).

so if anything, you'll want a system that is better at producing the higher frequencies we identify recognizable speech with and a guitar amp should be no worse at that than a bass amp. but a 2-way speaker cab with a tweeter will be MUCH better at reproducing these frequencies.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Jul 7, 2011,
#6
Quote by gumbilicious


something with a speaker and a tweeter and a crossover to make sure the right device is getting the right frequency of signal. usually the speaker in these devices are full range.


why is that?

the fundamental frequency for the 'bass' vocal range is ~80 hz to ~350 hz, which is roughly the range of a guitar and that is the lowest frequency vocal range. furthermore the low notes of the fundamental frequency won't be the ones we identify as the dominant sound of a human voice.

our ears will actually pick up the higher order harmonics, and more importantly, the formants that define the vowel sounds of singer. these frequencies will be ~300 hz to 2500 hz or so (which makes sense because that is where are ears are most sensitive).

so if anything, you'll want a system that is better at producing the higher frequencies we identify recognizable speech with and a guitar amp should be no worse at that than a bass amp. but a 2-way speaker cab with a tweeter will be MUCH better at reproducing these frequencies.


im a little too stoned to explain in a science way, but bass amps work really well for vocals. they sound better as radios too. I think its because guitar amps have too much focus on the mids, while a bass amp is flatter.
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#7
Quote by the_perdestrian
im a little too stoned to explain in a science way,






i wanna be in an altered state. gotta be legit though, the man is on my back.

take one to the dome for me.

Quote by the_perdestrian
but bass amps work really well for vocals. they sound better as radios too. I think its because guitar amps have too much focus on the mids, while a bass amp is flatter.


probably something to do with stiffer speaker components and a more flat response mayhap. but that is only a guess.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#8
It depends on what kind of voice tone you want, obviously you're using a Fender so you'll have more of an American voicing. Some people use Marshalls to get more of a british voice, I've heard a guy use an engl for a german voice, and another use some no-name asian made amp for an asian voice. all work quite well in my opinion as accents dont really matter when it comes to singing unless you're one of those type who really try to get everything in the song the same sounding way. Personally I find that real tone comes from the tounge and lips though so remember that when you're trying to emulate someone else's tone.
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#9
You can get rid of feedback by having the microphone away from the speaker. Preferably behind it.

Nothing wrong with playing a microphone into a tube amp, though. Tube PAs were fairly common back in the day.
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#11
Quote by JAHellraiser
It depends on what kind of voice tone you want, obviously you're using a Fender so you'll have more of an American voicing. Some people use Marshalls to get more of a british voice, I've heard a guy use an engl for a german voice, and another use some no-name asian made amp for an asian voice. all work quite well in my opinion as accents dont really matter when it comes to singing unless you're one of those type who really try to get everything in the song the same sounding way. Personally I find that real tone comes from the tounge and lips though so remember that when you're trying to emulate someone else's tone.



Fantastic.
#12
Quote by JAHellraiser
It depends on what kind of voice tone you want, obviously you're using a Fender so you'll have more of an American voicing. Some people use Marshalls to get more of a british voice, I've heard a guy use an engl for a german voice, and another use some no-name asian made amp for an asian voice. all work quite well in my opinion as accents dont really matter when it comes to singing unless you're one of those type who really try to get everything in the song the same sounding way. Personally I find that real tone comes from the tounge and lips though so remember that when you're trying to emulate someone else's tone.



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#13
Quote by JAHellraiser
It depends on what kind of voice tone you want, obviously you're using a Fender so you'll have more of an American voicing. Some people use Marshalls to get more of a british voice, I've heard a guy use an engl for a german voice, and another use some no-name asian made amp for an asian voice. all work quite well in my opinion as accents dont really matter when it comes to singing unless you're one of those type who really try to get everything in the song the same sounding way. Personally I find that real tone comes from the tounge and lips though so remember that when you're trying to emulate someone else's tone.


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