#1
Whats the point? Is it to learn how to use your muscles and to gain more control without using too much force?
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#6
Sounds to me like what you really need is a new amp
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#7
It's some article or something I read that you cut out a piece of paper the shape of a pick and try to play with that and you'll see how you'll be using too much force to pick the strings, and it's supposed to help you with something, just don't remember what.
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#8
If you read about it then you should have found out what the point is.

If I recall correctly, it's to show you that the strings press back on the arm and that most people tense in response to this instead of relaxing through it.
#9
OP, you should post the article... sounds intresting.

The only time I have ever used a paper pick is because pick gnomes stole all of mine and I was desprite... so I was forced to improvise
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#11
Quote by ethan_hanus
Just use a lighter gauge pick, so it flexes, less stress on your arms.

Bingo. That's what I do.
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#12
Quote by evhbrianmay
Bingo. That's what I do.


Everybody thinks using thicker picks enables you to pick faster, it doesn't, it just covers up a flawed picking dynamic technique. If you want to pick faster, bring the pick closer to your fingertips, if you want to pick lighter, move the tip of the pick farther away from the tip of your fingers.
#13
^ so, effectively, hold the pick so it acts like a firmer pick if you want to play faster. You need a pick that's firm enough to transmit force to the strings. That's it's job.

Not to mention, that's not anything to do with dynamics.

And even if it was, easier to play softly with a hard pick than loud and clear with a soft one.
#14
Quote by ethan_hanus
Everybody thinks using thicker picks enables you to pick faster, it doesn't, it just covers up a flawed picking dynamic technique. If you want to pick faster, bring the pick closer to your fingertips, if you want to pick lighter, move the tip of the pick farther away from the tip of your fingers.

A thicker pick (up to a certain point) doesn't bend/flop around as much when you strike the string, allowing you transmit potentially greater force with more accuracy.
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#15
Quote by ethan_hanus
Everybody thinks using thicker picks enables you to pick faster, it doesn't, it just covers up a flawed picking dynamic technique. If you want to pick faster, bring the pick closer to your fingertips, if you want to pick lighter, move the tip of the pick farther away from the tip of your fingers.


Spoken like someone who has never truly played with a thick pick in his life. Maybe your technique is so bad that when you switch to the thick pick, you can see all your flaws? Cause that's what it should do.

THINNER picks make you play more sloppy, less accurate, harder to do harmonics, harder to speed/alt pick, less tone, etc.

But they have their place, like learning chord songs on acoustic, its hard to get someone to strum up and down with a thick pick until they are very comfortable with picking in general.
#16
I never heard of anything like that. The only reason I would use a pick is if I were to loose all of my picks, and I was in a situation where I needed to play.
#17
Quote by hansome21
Spoken like someone who has never truly played with a thick pick in his life. Maybe your technique is so bad that when you switch to the thick pick, you can see all your flaws? Cause that's what it should do.

THINNER picks make you play more sloppy, less accurate, harder to do harmonics, harder to speed/alt pick, less tone, etc.

But they have their place, like learning chord songs on acoustic, its hard to get someone to strum up and down with a thick pick until they are very comfortable with picking in general.


I've used plenty of thick picks, and I play lots of music with lots of dynamics, and with thick picks, you can't get any dynamics, if you pick lighter, you get that famous clicking noise, which I hate, and it's not any quieter. With a light pick, if you pick lightly it sounds quiet, if you pick hard it sounds just as present as any heavy pick will get you.

Thick picks are for those who can't play lightly, usually jazz or metal heads.
#18
Quote by ethan_hanus
Thick picks are for those who can't play lightly, usually jazz or metal heads.


I resent this. i use 2mm picks and i play every genre of music, from reggae to death metal to blues to polka, sometimes all in the same song. i find the thick pick is able to handle any picking task, whereas the light ones aren't good for any heavy music. But soft playing and dynamics are very possible with a thick pick.
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#19
Quote by ethan_hanus
I've used plenty of thick picks, and I play lots of music with lots of dynamics, and with thick picks, you can't get any dynamics, if you pick lighter, you get that famous clicking noise, which I hate, and it's not any quieter. With a light pick, if you pick lightly it sounds quiet, if you pick hard it sounds just as present as any heavy pick will get you.

Thick picks are for those who can't play lightly, usually jazz or metal heads.

A thicker pick doesn't keep you from having dynamic control. The strings will sound out louder because there is more energy being transferred to them, but that doesn't mean that you can't have dynamic control. It just means that more of the energy your wrist is putting behind that pick is being transferred to the string. If you can't control that and rely on a thinner pick to dampen that excess energy, that's your problem. I can get dynamics all I want out of a 3mm pick. It's very possible.
#20
Quote by ethan_hanus
I've used plenty of thick picks, and I play lots of music with lots of dynamics, and with thick picks, you can't get any dynamics, if you pick lighter, you get that famous clicking noise, which I hate, and it's not any quieter. With a light pick, if you pick lightly it sounds quiet, if you pick hard it sounds just as present as any heavy pick will get you.

Thick picks are for those who can't play lightly, usually jazz or metal heads.


Sounds like you need to work on your control, because dynamics should be easy to manipulate with any pick. On an electric, muting/technique/volume knob control have a lot more to do with dynamics than whatever pick you use. People who claim it is their "gear" that makes them suck, usually just really suck.
#21
Quote by cccp2006
It's some article or something I read that you cut out a piece of paper the shape of a pick and try to play with that and you'll see how you'll be using too much force to pick the strings, and it's supposed to help you with something, just don't remember what.


#22
Quote by hansome21
THINNER picks make you play more sloppy, less accurate, harder to do harmonics, harder to speed/alt pick, less tone, etc.

Maybe if you have always used thick picks and try one thin pick...
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#23
Paper picks just wear down and make your guitar look dirty.

And heavier picks give more stability, but it's also the material. I used to use 1.5 tortex sharpies till I lost them all. Now I just use 1.14 gators :]

Admittedly, thinner picks are easier to get more accuracy out of. They're kind of like women... some like em thin, some like em thick. Get over it.
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#24
Quote by Freepower
And even if it was, easier to play softly with a hard pick than loud and clear with a soft one.

Plagiarist

I've never heard of this before but I imagine it's a variation of the "Learn something the hard way and the easy way will be easier" ethos which isn't always practical.
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#25
Quote by TheBurningFish
I imagine it's a variation of the "Learn something the hard way and the easy way will be easier" ethos which isn't always practical.

No, it means that it's easier to transmit less force with a pick that is more efficient at transmitting force than it is to transmit greater force with a pick that is less efficient at transmitting force.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
Last edited by Aleksi at Jul 9, 2011,
#26
Quote by Aleksi
No, it means that it's easier to transmit less force with a pick that is more efficient at transmitting force than it is to transmit greater force with a pick that is less efficient at transmitting force.

In the bit you quoted I was talking about the OP. Sorry, I didn't make that obvious.
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#27
Quote by evhbrianmay
Maybe if you have always used thick picks and try one thin pick...


Nope, started with thin picks for years actually, switched for tone, pinch harmonics, and overall better control. Any other ideas smartass?

#29
A thicker pick would actually bring out your mistakes more because it would hit any extra strings or wrong notes with more force. And thinner picks are terrible for faster picking. The flop a bit too much and cause sloppiness and uneven strokes. I change my picks to suit what I'm playing. If I'm playing something like Alter Bridge or Alice in Chains on my electric, I use a 1.14mm. Everything else on electric I use .73mm. And I use ONLY .73mm nylons on my acoustic so it's easier on the strings and I feel it gives it a nicer tone than Tortex on acoustic. Sorry to be off-topic. :P
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#30
Regardless, Jazz III all the way.

In my opinion, thicker picks expand the overall range of dynamic possibilities, along with providing more consistancy in general.

I'm going to compare them thoroughly now, and be as objective as possible, but the prior statement was from previous personal experience.
#31
Quote by ethan_hanus
Just use a lighter gauge pick, so it flexes, less stress on your arms.

Exactly
#32
i find thick picks easier to control and faster because of the large bevel, makes up and down strokes much easier. just my opinion to each his own, no need to get up tight and upset with each other.
#33
A thicker pick would actually bring out your mistakes more because it would hit any extra strings or wrong notes with more force.


Sure, but anyone halfway decent at picking shouldn't be hitting the wrong strings entirely.
#36
Quote by hansome21
THINNER picks make you play more sloppy, less accurate, harder to do harmonics, harder to speed/alt pick, less tone, etc.



I don't play sloppy and I use .73s and .6s. And less tone? You mean different tone, right? Thinner picks give you a brighter, more trebly tone and I don't see how A thick pick give you better tone when using no pick at all sounds the best to some people.
#37
Quote by Dmaj7
I don't play sloppy and I use .73s and .6s. And less tone? You mean different tone, right? Thinner picks give you a brighter, more trebly tone and I don't see how A thick pick give you better tone when using no pick at all sounds the best to some people.

I never found any significant tone difference in pick thickness.
Definite tonal characteristics depending on pick material though...

All gauge picks have some advantages and some disadvantages. They don't make a player any better or worse by themselves.
i.e. a great player will still sound great with pretty much any pick, even though they might still have a personal favorite.