#1
I've been playing quite a while now, and while I don't consider myself a professional or 'master' guitarist by any means, I am quite good. One of my good friends shelled out a (small) lump sum for a first guitar/amp, which I helped him choose. This was based on the understanding that for a fee, I would teach him how to play. I think it will be quite easy to teach him, he already knows plenty of theory and such (he can play french horn, tenor and alto saxophone, baritone, and trumpet), and wanted to learn guitar. I was planning to charge him about $10-$15 for an hour lesson.

Then, I started thinking some more.

His family is honestly kind of poor. They're all good people and all, just not the richest in the neighborhood. He says he should be able to have enough money for quite a few lessons after the summer. I don't have much need for money at my age other than to have it. So I'm asking all of you, should I just give him free lessons? I would charge pretty much anyone else, but not a poor friend like him. I would also hate for him to spend that money on something he will never properly use.

What do you think I should do?
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#2
I would just give my friend free lessons. You said you're no professional, and you guys should probably just have fun with it.

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#3
standard lessons around here go for $25 an hour. I taught a few of my friends basics on guitar and worked with them several hours on technique, chords, scales, etc...Never charged them being friends and all, but if word gets out that you give lessons, don't be afraid of charging people you don't know. Karma goes a long ways. You do a favor for your friends for nothing in return, who knows that they will stop by to help you paint your house on a weekend or move furniture, or just hang out and bbq or tag along wherever you go and your bored. Hope this helps. Expect nothing in return from friends, but have the utmost of feeling of accomplishment and helping out a friend in need. Plus it's a great feeling of someone that wants to to take the time and learn from you. Make sense?
#5
Quote by SchecterDean
standard lessons around here go for $25 an hour. I taught a few of my friends basics on guitar and worked with them several hours on technique, chords, scales, etc...Never charged them being friends and all, but if word gets out that you give lessons, don't be afraid of charging people you don't know. Karma goes a long ways. You do a favor for your friends for nothing in return, who knows that they will stop by to help you paint your house on a weekend or move furniture, or just hang out and bbq or tag along wherever you go and your bored. Hope this helps. Expect nothing in return from friends, but have the utmost of feeling of accomplishment and helping out a friend in need. Plus it's a great feeling of someone that wants to to take the time and learn from you. Make sense?



exactly
#6
You will gain as much by teaching him as he will gain by being taught.

Do it. It is priceless.
#7
Seems pretty unanimous, free lessons then. Honestly, I was probably going to give the lessons free anyway, despite what you said, but you just confirmed the feeling.

Thanks.
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If there's anything to take away from this thread, anything at all, it's to always cup the balls.


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God dammit you had me 10/10
#8
Quote by DJ_Effrey
Be a friend, and don't accept a cent for teaching him.


Have him pay in pizza and beer Micky D's and soda etc.

EDIT: I've done this and it's worked well also a "lesson" jam session could last a couple of hours.

No time limits very little structure just keep it fun and enjoy teaching your friend.

You'll be surprised how much you'll learn in the process teaching it's one of the best ways to learn.
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Last edited by Willowthewitch at Jul 8, 2011,
#9
Yeah, unless you are pro or very good I wouldn't do it.

What I tend to do, it take the novice under my "wing" so to speak. I teach him in the process of jamming, playing in a band. It's a good way to show him the ropes. They usually come out a better player. If he's musically experienced already, this situation shouldn't be too much of a burden.
#11
Quote by guitarmaniac88
I've been playing quite a while now, and while I don't consider myself a professional or 'master' guitarist by any means, I am quite good. One of my good friends shelled out a (small) lump sum for a first guitar/amp, which I helped him choose. This was based on the understanding that for a fee, I would teach him how to play. I think it will be quite easy to teach him, he already knows plenty of theory and such (he can play french horn, tenor and alto saxophone, baritone, and trumpet), and wanted to learn guitar. I was planning to charge him about $10-$15 for an hour lesson.

Then, I started thinking some more.

His family is honestly kind of poor. They're all good people and all, just not the richest in the neighborhood. He says he should be able to have enough money for quite a few lessons after the summer. I don't have much need for money at my age other than to have it. So I'm asking all of you, should I just give him free lessons? I would charge pretty much anyone else, but not a poor friend like him. I would also hate for him to spend that money on something he will never properly use.

What do you think I should do?


I think an hour lesson in general is too long.

I'd have to think carefully on that one. If paying money, they have a vested interest, and investment into their learning. Of course I would feel it was immoral to charge something that caused hardship. I'm going to say this very....conservatively....

IF I knew that they would "pay" for their lessons, via practice and consistency, if I could see them really taking what I had to show them, and being a grade A committed student, I'd teach for free (confidentially) and it would take a lot for me to lean that far against the grain, because everything in me says, make them pay "something", not to be greedy, but as a token of investment into their development. Maybe $5.00 per lesson, and make the lesson over when its over, rather than a set time, especially if you don't have a train of students waiting in the wings afterwards.

I'd be very clear and firm in my expectations of their side of things between lessons. If I had them do xyz, then that's what I would expect to see when they return for the next lesson. Its only fair, give and take.

My .02

Sean
#12
Quote by guitarmaniac88
Seems pretty unanimous, free lessons then. Honestly, I was probably going to give the lessons free anyway, despite what you said, but you just confirmed the feeling.

Thanks.



Good for you man... the pizza and beer idea while jamming is great. I've done this with several of my friends as well "some better than me, some not so much", always works out great. Not to mention a beginner will get much from a 30 min jam then they would from 2 hr's of cramming theory any day... plus he can study theory on his own time, not yours

Your young so I'll give you the best advise I have ever had given to me... never mix family/friends with business!!!

i.e. don’t loan money to friends/family and never sell or buy things from them.

As soon as you start throwing money into a friendship or relationship it tends to create a lot of animosity... which is a sure fire way to end that said friendship/relationship in a hurry.
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Well played, sir, well played.
#13
If you seriously want to get into giving lessons, charge what everyone else around you charges. If you've have been playing for a couple years, you know a lot more than any beginner. You could give your friend a discount just to get experience, but if the guy next door is charging $60/hour you should charge $60/hour even if he's been teaching 20 years.

Sometimes people value you on your price. People often don't want to "discount teacher" in their area. Plus, you do not want to teach the people that are price shopping. They honestly have no clue and will likely stop taking lessons shortly after they start.
#14
Quote by DJ_Effrey
Be a friend, and don't accept a cent for teaching him.


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#15
Quote by freakstylez
You will gain as much by teaching him as he will gain by being taught.

Do it. It is priceless.

This. If you're not an experienced teacher it would be just plain wrong to charge him money for your lessons. It's good teaching practise and might be fun at the same time. Kudos for your choice.
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#16
I'd say charging is no problem, however, I've never charged friends. I have however never taught them on regular basis, while I have a plan with my own students. So if you are going to charge, better make sure you know what you're doing, and what you have planned. I'd suggest laying off the coin for a bit, just to learn.
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