#1
Is there a way to trigger sound effects live? for example, if you have a song out with a reverse cymbal or bass drop and you want to play it live like that, it there some kind of pedal that could trigger or Que those those effects?
#2
There is a way, but unless you have all the pedals and triggers I'd say it's best to avoid using those effects, because it will lead to threads like this :|
#4
Well you could record the sound edit it 'till it sounds how you want it and when needed just press the play button. It's the same as the midi only you've recorded this sound by yourself. If it's for the drummer a drumpad can become in handy (link is a picture). You should be able to assign a sound to each spot. When hit they will simply play the (recorded) sound.
lalala
#5
Quote by Zeletros
There is a way, but unless you have all the pedals and triggers I'd say it's best to avoid using those effects, because it will lead to threads like this :|

cool story bro.

what my band uses is a click track with the effects in the left panned tracked and the click in the right. the drummer has the right in his ears while the effects go to the PA.

some people dislike the track because it doesn't give you freedom. but shit, it sounds way better.
#6
Quote by CrazyTy
cool story bro.

what my band uses is a click track with the effects in the left panned tracked and the click in the right. the drummer has the right in his ears while the effects go to the PA.

some people dislike the track because it doesn't give you freedom. but shit, it sounds way better.

This is what I would do.

It's not like you have a ton of freedom when playing in a band anyways
#7
Yes, but what if there's a lot of sounds that you can't put on a MIDI controller, or extra guitar layers, etc.?

We could go on "What ifs?" all day, but it just comes down to personal preference.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Apr 26, 2013,
#8
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's not like you have a ton of freedom when playing in a band anyways

you still have the freedom of improvising Not because the song is written that you'll have to follow each and every note.
Quote by CrazyTy
what my band uses is a click track with the effects in the left panned tracked and the click in the right. the drummer has the right in his ears while the effects go to the PA.

That clicktrack thingy is good when using longer recorded sounds or riffs. For short(er) sounds I would choose a midi controller.
lalala
#9
Quote by Didii
you still have the freedom of improvising Not because the song is written that you'll have to follow each and every note.


Well yes, but what's that have to do with playing to a click and timing the samples that way?

I like it. If it works it works, and I've seen it work.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Apr 26, 2013,
#10
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Well yes, but what's that have to do with playing to a click and timing the samples that way?

You could change the timing or the frequency of the sounds when using a midi controller, not with the clicktracks. It's also harder if you want to speak to the crowd during the song (so the rest of the band keeps repeating a few bars).
And like I said before: I'm more thinking of really short sounds like hand clap or something, not riffs.
lalala
#11
Quote by Didii
You could change the timing or the frequency of the sounds when using a midi controller, not with the clicktracks. It's also harder if you want to speak to the crowd during the song (so the rest of the band keeps repeating a few bars).


Yeah, I could see the problem there, but...

And like I said before: I'm more thinking of really short sounds like hand clap or something, not riffs.

We're talking about two different things I'm talking about a string section, a choir section, fade-in guitars, two extra guitars that you don't have enough people to play, etc.