#1
I am thinking about giving guitar lessons to beginners. I got a lot of people coming up to me and ask me to give them lessons, so I plan on officially start giving lessons to people. My question is what should I teach them?? ( I plan on teaching practical stuff like techniques and stuff, and the basic theory stuff like scales, modes etc)

This was how I was going to teach........ (In order)

1. Parts of a guitar
2. Open Chords
3. Picking (Alternate, Economy)
4. Scales (Minor Pentatonic)
5. Hammer-On/Pull-Off's
6. Bends
7. Improvising

etc......


^^ Is this a good order? Or should I include some other stuff in there or change the order? Give some feedback and ideas please.


Thanks,
#2
I'd ask people what they want to play, because people enjoy learning more if it's stuff they wanna know.
By all means incorporate those things into the lessons, especially if they come up in the songs they're learning. It gives it substance rather than just learning random techniques.
#4
Quote by Sean0913
One thing I'd suggest is, if you are a right handed player, try to play the guitar left handed.

While playing left handed, try to do the things you are about to be teaching, and post back your observations in this thread.

Best,

Sean

Never thought about this method before. I'll try it out too, 'cause some are asking me too
lalala
#5
Quote by Sean0913
One thing I'd suggest is, if you are a right handed player, try to play the guitar left handed.

While playing left handed, try to do the things you are about to be teaching, and post back your observations in this thread.

Best,

Sean


Tried playing leftie, here are my observations........

1. My pinky is weak
2. I cant fret properly
3. My picking is inaccurate

Are you suggesting finger strengthening exercises?
#6
Quote by MaddMann274
Tried playing leftie, here are my observations........

1. My pinky is weak
2. I cant fret properly
3. My picking is inaccurate

Are you suggesting finger strengthening exercises?



I'm suggesting that this is what it's like for a beginner. Now knowing what you know, as someone that plays like you just did, how would you teach them? What seems like the best first steps? What can you expect, as far as how fast they pick things up? What is likely to be too much and frustrate them? How do you overcome their feelings of weakness and inadequacy and initial doubts and hence motivations, which might cause them to give up?

What can you do to ensure early success and keep them happy and positive about learning to play?

Its real easy to forget how hard it is for a beginner, at first when getting ready to teach others. Now, you have first hand knowledge again...it's very difficult. To be a good teacher, regardless of what you teach put yourself back in their shoes again and figure out how you're going to best be able to approach the challenges that they will be faced with.

Best,

Sean
#7
Quote by Sean0913
I'm suggesting that this is what it's like for a beginner. Now knowing what you know, as someone that plays like you just did, how would you teach them? What seems like the best first steps? What can you expect, as far as how fast they pick things up? What is likely to be too much and frustrate them? How do you overcome their feelings of weakness and inadequacy and initial doubts and hence motivations, which might cause them to give up?

What can you do to ensure early success and keep them happy and positive about learning to play?

Its real easy to forget how hard it is for a beginner, at first when getting ready to teach others. Now, you have first hand knowledge again...it's very difficult. To be a good teacher, regardless of what you teach put yourself back in their shoes again and figure out how you're going to best be able to approach the challenges that they will be faced with.

Best,

Sean



I got it, Thanks dude.
#8
Start from the basic. The left hand exercise was a great way to you in touch with what it's like to be a beginner all over again. Props on that!

Start will simple stuff. I like teaching my student how to read some simple tab first. I don't just into chords right away because, as you saw, fretting chords is difficult. So I take a couple weeks to work on cool bass lines from popular songs that help to work finger dexterity, as well as some finger independence exercises.

I find this helps out a lot when you move on to chords instead of just throwing them straight into chords. The tab method makes them feel like they can actually play guitar. Just keep it simple for beginners.