#1
Welcome to Free and Easy Guitar - Music Theory: Scales #1 → Major & Minor Scale Construction

so i am new to theory and would appreciate some help.

My question is related to tones. Is moving from C# to D a Semi tone/ half step?

Is moving from F to F# a Semi Tone/ half step?

I also don't understand the sentence " starting at the G note ( 3rd fret, low E string) and moving up a full tone would put you on the A note (5th fret, low E string) ".

Ok so if G note is on the 3rd fret and the A note is on the 5th fret, where is the F note? In what order is this going?
#2
Quote by hhhhdmt
Welcome to Free and Easy Guitar - Music Theory: Scales #1 → Major & Minor Scale Construction

so i am new to theory and would appreciate some help.

My question is related to tones. Is moving from C# to D a Semi tone/ half step?

Is moving from F to F# a Semi Tone/ half step?

I also don't understand the sentence " starting at the G note ( 3rd fret, low E string) and moving up a full tone would put you on the A note (5th fret, low E string) ".

Ok so if G note is on the 3rd fret and the A note is on the 5th fret, where is the F note? In what order is this going?


1. Yes

2. Yes

3. A full tone is a 2 fret distance.

4. The order is alphabetic. Although after G, it starts over at A. A B C D E F G A B C...etc

3. The F is behind the G at the 1st fret.

As an aside, I don't like the lesson in that link. I think its too overwhelming for a beginner, and I think it doesn't do a good job at teaching. My advice, instead of digesting it as a single lesson, break it down into 5 mini lessons and make sure you understand each section before going to the next.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 8, 2011,
#3
F is the 1st fret.

The E string is arranged like this: E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E

You are correct; C# to D is a semitone/half step, as well as F to F#. When you move up a single fret, it is always a half-step; moving two frets forward or backwards is a whole tone.

There is a whole step between each natural note except for B-C and E-F; they are semitones by nature. I do not know why. Therefore, C to D is a whole step, D to E is a whole step, F to G is a whole step, and G to A is a whole step.
#4
Quote by freakstylez


There is a whole step between each natural note except for B-C and E-F; they are semitones by nature. I do not know why. Therefore, C to D is a whole step, D to E is a whole step, F to G is a whole step, and G to A is a whole step.


Something to do with frequencies and how the piano was designed. Could also be the name just sticking, but I'm not too sure tbh.
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#5
Quote by Chikao42
Something to do with frequencies and how the piano was designed. Could also be the name just sticking, but I'm not too sure tbh.


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#6
Thanks for the answers, guys

I am still confused about one thing. On the low E string, it goes E F F# G. So does that mean E is on the first fret of the low e string, F is on the second fret, and F# is on the third fret? I thought G was supposed to be on the third fret?
#10
Does anyone have a link for a website which has a picture with all the notes on the fingerboard?
#12
I've finished this lesson and it talks about the E Major scale at the end. And how the relative minor scale to any major scale starts of at the 6th note.

So i decided to use the A major scale to find the relative minor scale. I just wanted to know whether i have understood this correctly or not?

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A major scale: A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#-A

Therefore the relative minor scale of the A major scale is the F# minor scale.

F# minor scale: F#-G#-A-B-C#-D-E-F#

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
#13
Quote by hhhhdmt
I've finished this lesson and it talks about the E Major scale at the end. And how the relative minor scale to any major scale starts of at the 6th note.

So i decided to use the A major scale to find the relative minor scale. I just wanted to know whether i have understood this correctly or not?

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A major scale: A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#-A

Therefore the relative minor scale of the A major scale is the F# minor scale.

F# minor scale: F#-G#-A-B-C#-D-E-F#

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


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