#1
Hello,

I'm trying to figure out what effect(s) David Gilmour used during this once specific part of the first SOYCD track. It starts at approximately 7:40 and lasts about a minute. It's such nice, warm tone that's clearly different than the tone used throughout the rest of the track.

I have no idea; I'm pretty clueless when it comes to the world of effects and such. Maybe a Blues Driver?

I looked at http://www.gilmourish.com/?page_id=47, but I didn't see anything that stood out.

Thanks for taking a look.
Matt-
#2
he's using the bridge pickup, with some what sounds like chorus/flange/phaser, some reverb, and a touch of overdrive if i'm not mistaken.
also maybe a wah or treble biased EQ.


edit: wikipedia entry on this bit
Part III (Gilmour, Wright, Waters; from 6:27 – 8:41) begins with a Minimoog synthesizer solo by Richard Wright. This part includes a third Gilmour guitar solo which is bluesy in tone. When performed on the Animals tour, Gilmour added distortion to the guitar for this solo. (this bluesy guitar solo is often dropped in live performances whilst the rest of part iii is still played - notably Delicate Sound of Thunder and Pulse.)
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Last edited by Dempsey68 at Jul 8, 2011,
#4
Cool, thanks for the quick response and wiki reference. Yea, I kind of figured there was more than one thing going on. I'll play around with some stuff tonight.

lol Pat, that is because this song kicks @ss!
#5
He used a Colorsound Power Boost (which was eventually renamed the Overdriver) most likely. He was also fond of turning down the volume on his Strat with his Fuzz Face on for an overdrive sound back then, although he used that technique more on DSotM.

Also bear in mind he prefers to use a clean amp and use pedals for distortion.
#6
For the "Wish You were Here" album, he used Leslie rotary speakers on his solos, a Colorsound Power Boost (as mentioned above) and a strat through his HiWatt DR-103. He laid off the fuzz for most of this album.

You might notice that later on in the solo, the tone gets a bit more bitey. Keep your volume knob rolled back for the beginning of the solo and turn it all the way up when it gets to that part.
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Last edited by HellBoy9393 at Jul 8, 2011,
#7
Thanks for the info... After reading through that Gilmourish site, it seems that he used the Leslies and the Powerboost a lot. I took a quick look at some Powerboost and Overdrivers and they seem pretty expensive. I've honestly never personally heard of them; I'm surprised that aren't more popular then.
Matt-
Black Gibson SG - Gibson Dirty Fingers Coil Split/ Seymour Duncan 59' HB
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#8
The way pedals interact with your amp and guitar will make a difference in the tone. You can get close to the sound with any number of pedals. Play well and nobody will notice the difference. Learn to tweak your gear.

The biggest change you can make is to get a guitar with single coil pups. There's a huge difference between humbuckers and single coils.
#10
One of the things that's key to SOYCD is compression, and loads of it. As an example, Steve McElroy of the Aussie Floyd show stacks both a CS2 and an original 75 Dynacomp to get that clicky warmth in the first solo.

Re the OP, when he plays it on the red strat, he uses the EMG Expander on c. 4 and the mid boost on c. 7, which warms it up a lot.

For us mere mortals, a timmy does the job splendidly.- I use the timmy for the first bit and Syd's theme, and then stack the timmy and a Cornish SS3 for the second more blusey solo.
#12
Quote by jakey333
One of the things that's key to SOYCD is compression, and loads of it. As an example, Steve McElroy of the Aussie Floyd show stacks both a CS2 and an original 75 Dynacomp to get that clicky warmth in the first solo.

Re the OP, when he plays it on the red strat, he uses the EMG Expander on c. 4 and the mid boost on c. 7, which warms it up a lot.

For us mere mortals, a timmy does the job splendidly.- I use the timmy for the first bit and Syd's theme, and then stack the timmy and a Cornish SS3 for the second more blusey solo.


Sorry, what is a timmy? And what does it do?

I know I will not be able to ever fully recreate DG's sounds with my guitars, but I am for messing around with different sounds/tone. I think it does help a little having the Gibson Dirty fingers HB/single coil split on my Gibson. I have 3 completely different tones on my Black Gibson.
Matt-
Black Gibson SG - Gibson Dirty Fingers Coil Split/ Seymour Duncan 59' HB
Brown Satin Gibson SG - Seymour Duncan Invader
Squier 60's Classic Vibe Strat
Epiphone Electric Accoustic
Marshall Valvestate
Fender Mustang II
Boss DS-1
Vox Wah
#14
Quote by thetalonguy
Sorry, what is a timmy? And what does it do?

I know I will not be able to ever fully recreate DG's sounds with my guitars, but I am for messing around with different sounds/tone. I think it does help a little having the Gibson Dirty fingers HB/single coil split on my Gibson. I have 3 completely different tones on my Black Gibson.

Timmy is an Overdrive Pedal made by Paul Cochrane that while expensive is regarded as one of the best overdrive pedals.