#1
hey, I was watching a vid of this dude playing in different keys, and he played the same song in keys of c and b. This got me wondering do different keys have like their own personality?

For example, this is just made up but what if it were like this:

Em: Dark
Am: Sad
F: Angry

or whatever.

Has anyone else noticed that or is it just me? Then again would this theory even work, i mean if you played a song in a different key its still the song right?

Cheers,
Jimmi.

P.S. I placed this in 2 Songwriting and MUsicians corner cos I wasn't sure where it would be best to put it.
#2
no. they simply sound different. a song played in F minor will be just as sad as one played in B minor. people have tried for many years to associate each key with a separate emotion or evocative feeling, but anyone who thinks so is simply fooling themselves.

however, if you were to compose a symphony in F minor, state the theme in F minor, and then state the theme again in Eb minor (a whole step lower), it will sound sadder because the listener has the reference to the theme F minor. comparatively speaking, the differences absolutely exist -- but intrinsically, they don't each have their own correlation.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#3
Not really. I mean, a particular song will feel a bit different in different keys. But not every (or even most songs) in the same key have the same mood. The key doesn't automatically assign a feeling.
#5
Well like with that example all of those carry that feeling if you're simply playing that chord while in the key of G. If you're in C, then the Am would probably have more of the dark feeling, while F would sound regular with the key. It's all relative for chords having different kinds of feels depending on the key, and most have the same qualities. You do always have the issue of low/high keys, but that's not a big deal.
If it's creative, true to your musical goal, and it sounds good, put it in the song.

1. Guitar, delay, verb, amp, and creativity.
2. Well-tuned acoustic piano and creativity.
3. A bottle of water.
#7
No but putting in accidentals in the scale would.
Alot of guitarists including me would say these accidentals are part of a modal scale.
But because I'm going to get killed, I'm not.
These accidentals actualy make up the sound.
You have like the flat 2 in minor which is like mad.
You have the Major sixth which produces a lighter minor quality.
And you have the normal minor scale.
Even though an E minor with a flat 2nd do match the C major scale material, it still is a different sound because your root is actually E minor.
#8
Quote by liampje

You have like the flat 2 in minor which is like mad.
You have the Major sixth which produces a lighter minor quality.


I'm thinking you do know what your talking about and just worded this badly, but a minor scale does not naturally have a flat 2, and a major sixth is obviously not inherently minor.
I'm going to assume you meant if you use these intervals in a minor scale thus making phrygian or dorian.
#9
Dm is the saddest of all keys.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#10
Quote by AeolianWolf
no. they simply sound different. a song played in F minor will be just as sad as one played in B minor. people have tried for many years to associate each key with a separate emotion or evocative feeling, but anyone who thinks so is simply fooling themselves.

however, if you were to compose a symphony in F minor, state the theme in F minor, and then state the theme again in Eb minor (a whole step lower), it will sound sadder because the listener has the reference to the theme F minor. comparatively speaking, the differences absolutely exist -- but intrinsically, they don't each have their own correlation.


This!
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
no. they simply sound different. a song played in F minor will be just as sad as one played in B minor. people have tried for many years to associate each key with a separate emotion or evocative feeling, but anyone who thinks so is simply fooling themselves.

however, if you were to compose a symphony in F minor, state the theme in F minor, and then state the theme again in Eb minor (a whole step lower), it will sound sadder because the listener has the reference to the theme F minor. comparatively speaking, the differences absolutely exist -- but intrinsically, they don't each have their own correlation.


I've played pieces in different keys and that doesn't happen to me. Like Dm always sounds the saddest to me, and Am has less sadness but it has a sense of paranoia to it that Dm doesn't have. Maybe it's not completly true but there is some degree of truth in this idea I think.
Last edited by yoyoyoitcool at Jul 9, 2011,