#1
I've been involved with theory for 4 years now, and still have a lot of frustration when trying to be innovative with composition.

In my case of frustration, im trying to break free of 3 and 4 chord progressions of simple triads and seventh chords, but just hit a mental wall. Along with that, I desire to learn how to construct lines with the melodic minor scale a lot more but am just simply shattered on what chord progression to use. In the end, I just wish for my improv to be very tight and writing of chord progressions to be familiar to pink floyd and of course less frustrated with composing.

For those who are the experts of theory, what do you commonly do to practice new (and fun/quick) ways of applying chords to progressions and learning new scales?
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#2
I don't see how people consider knowing theory essential to be innovative in composing.

That's rather NOT innovative at all.


If you want to learn to write original pieces, I'd suggest you need to learn to write original pieces in an original way.
#3
Quote by Zeletros
I don't see how people consider knowing theory essential to be innovative in composing.

That's rather NOT innovative at all.


If you want to learn to write original pieces, I'd suggest you need to learn to write original pieces in an original way.


I really hope you're not suggesting that learning your theory can do anything but good for you. The idea that knowing it stunts creativity is bullshit.
#4
Of course knowing theory is absolutely brilliant because that way you actually know whats going on in a song and how to add to it or to cut out the fat from it. Not to mention it can give you ideas of cool new things to try and how to approach composition going for a specific effect.

But I think what Zeletros is saying does have a grain of truth. If you want to write more creative pieces then stepping outside of the theory and doing what sounds different to you can help massively.

Theory doesn't stunt creative growth at all and in fact helps it a lot. but trying to find a theoretical formula for creativity most certainly does.
#5
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
I really hope you're not suggesting that learning your theory can do anything but good for you. The idea that knowing it stunts creativity is bullshit.



I didn't understand what you're trying to say
#6
If you don't know it I would suggest learning music theory, it is more than a formula, it is also based on what your ear actually wants to hear. When you know the box, you know how to think outside of it, but "thinking outside the box" is often confused with "creativity", and that people get stuck in the rules. But these rules are in no way forcing you to stay in a certain scale, or that you must play a certain chord in a certain order.

It is a guide through western music, and how our ear works. That is the reason when travelling more to the east the music will sound more strange to us. That is the reason this theory does not apply to that music.

Music theory teaches scales, modulations, voicings, parallels, and much, much more. But it does not, whatsoever, tell you to shut up and do what is written.
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#7
Quote by Zeletros
I didn't understand what you're trying to say


You implied the that learning theory stunts creativity. I'm saying you have to first learn the rules so you can learn how to break them.
#8
Quote by Zeletros
I don't see how people consider knowing theory essential to be innovative in composing.

That's rather NOT innovative at all.


If you want to learn to write original pieces, I'd suggest you need to learn to write original pieces in an original way.



You misunderstand the purpose of theory.
#9
Quote by Zeletros
I don't see how people consider knowing theory essential to be innovative in composing.

That's rather NOT innovative at all.


If you want to learn to write original pieces, I'd suggest you need to learn to write original pieces in an original way.



And that is probably why you cant create anything. Don't post in here if you don't want to make a fool of yourself. Music theory pretty much De-confuses music, if you say that you cant be creative with music theory...then you are just improperly applying it.


So, to actually get some progress in this thread...do you all just practice with people who are better than you for hours on end just experimenting with whatever you want to work on?
#10
Most of the time Melodic minor as I see it used is over a Dominant chord for an outside note that hits upon the alterations of a dominant chord for flavor purposes and inside outside playing.

What is your fascination with composing in it? What is it that you want to do? It sort of reminds me with students of mine that initially make these grand declarations that they are going to compose an epic song in Bm7b5, and Locrian, like it's some mountain peak to conquer, rather than understanding what it is they are saying. I generally smile and tell them go for it - it becomes a great learning experience about making bold declarations, and usually, humility is a great teacher.

I can't tell you what your roadblocks are because I don't know what you know of theory, and even more what you've actually applied from it in the past. But my first instinct would to be to look for holes in your claims, which when filled in, would help you move forward. Most times I find that the first problem with comments like this, is they have some head knowledge, and little practice and even less gained wisdom from practice and observation. They learned in abstract, practiced in abstract and as a consequence, the entire form remains abstract.

You have to be able to connect all the dots, which is why I found your melodic minor comment to be curious.

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 10, 2011,