#1
Hey MT,

Does anyone know any basic things about music from these countries?

India
Bangladesh
Nigeria
Kenya
China
West Indies

The reason I ask is because we have a special day on Monday where some Y10 students help year 7s learn about world music. We aren't required to learn this but I want to know what I'm talking about.

Here's the little I know already [that my music teach taught]

India
- Dhol drums
- A fusion of traditional Indian music and western pop
- FX and multitracking.
- Dance music
- Chaal rhythm= crotchet then quaver [triplets]
- Became popular in 70s and 80s

African
- I don't think their music is written down either
- A lot of pentatonic
- A capello

Anything else?
I can't even point to the West Indies on a map!
Woffelz

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#2
A lot of music from Asia is based completely on the Pentatonic scales, such as China and Vietnam, and most likely other countries from that area as well. In fact, a lot of world music is based on the Pentatonic scales.
#3
Quote by zincabopataurio
A lot of music from Asia is based completely on the Pentatonic scales, such as China and Vietnam, and most likely other countries from that area as well. In fact, a lot of world music is based on the Pentatonic scales.


Hahaha, good one dude!

Wait, you were being sarcastic right? Right?
#4
Quote by parathy_r
Hahaha, good one dude!

Wait, you were being sarcastic right? Right?

Pentatonic, as in 5 tone. There are multiple pentatonic scales, rather than just the "Normal" pentatonics you would hear for Blues/Rock.

That being said, they still have their similarities in sound if you listen.

Don't forget about the sitar for Indian music! Sitars are amazing.
#5
Quote by zincabopataurio
A lot of music from Asia is based completely on the Pentatonic scales, such as China and Vietnam, and most likely other countries from that area as well. In fact, a lot of world music is based on the Pentatonic scales.


yeah a lot of it is. well some anyway. check out gamelan from bali, it's really really cool and usually pentatonic. gagaku is quite interesting as well, has as much to do with silence as with notes. that's japanese. chinese music i'm not so sure, the only proper chinese music i heard when i was there was people singing peking opera, and trust me, that's rough stuff, but it grows on you.

you could also look at folk music from ireland, sclotland etc, maybe cape breton music. Scandinavian music can be great as well. remember, world music doesn't just mean music from non white people.

look at poly rhythms and other rhythmic features in west african music, a lot of that is now in popular music from jazz etc, but that could be a nice link.

are you teaching this stuff to other students?
#6
Quote by Woffelz

India
- Dhol drums
- A fusion of traditional Indian music and western pop
- FX and multitracking.
- Dance music
- Chaal rhythm= crotchet then quaver [triplets]
- Became popular in 70s and 80s

You can't mention Indian music and not talk about raga.
#7
Quote by parathy_r
Hahaha, good one dude!

Wait, you were being sarcastic right? Right?

I hope you wernt serious...
#8
Middle-Eastern music in particular uses microtones (in addition to their 24-TET system) which can be replicated on instruments such as the human voice (the scales or maqamat as they call them are taught orally) or the oud or some similar fretless instrument.