#3
i learned it from the same places as sean, in essence.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
Quote by AeolianWolf
i learned it from the same places as sean, in essence.


Which is me.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
a combination of reading and analysis on my own of what i play, learning it offhandedly from private teachers, friends of mine, and master classes, this forum and formal theory classes (though honestly, id say ive learned just as much from analyzing, reading and talking to other good musicians then i have in a class room).
basically, if you have to learn a song, think about how it works, and what you can do with it. once you get the basics down, synthesis gets you much farther then memorization--if you integrate theory into every aspect of music making, it becomes a lot less scary, a lot less constricting and a lot easier.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#8
Yeah music school is a good place, but where else? Are there any websites or videos that give very advance insight into theory? I'm very young so I can't go to music school yet, but I want to know where on the interwebs I can learn some advance stuff.


forums like this one, also all about jazz has an entire forum dedicated to analysis and theory.
also, good books:
http://www.amazon.com/Tonal-Harmony-Stefan-Kostka/dp/0073401358/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1310350068&sr=1-1
thats a standard university theory text

these are a bit more specialized, and take things a bit more in depth (ive gotten through all of the jazz theory book, but the contemporary harmony one has a lot more interesting, and harder stuff)
http://www.amazon.com/Contemporary-Harmony-Romanticism-Through-Twelve-Tone/dp/0029328101/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1310350112&sr=1-2

http://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Theory-Book-Mark-Levine/dp/1883217040/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1310350147&sr=1-1
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Jul 10, 2011,
#9
Quote by carnagereap666
Yeah music school is a good place, but where else? Are there any websites or videos that give very advance insight into theory? I'm very young so I can't go to music school yet, but I want to know where on the interwebs I can learn some advance stuff.

You'll most likely get general knowledge or the "common sense" of music unless you study it constantly, day in and day out.

I'd recommend going to Juliard. Best decision I ever made.
#10
theory classes, books and older musicians. honestly, the apprenticeship system is still what I consider to be the best form of music education (as well as most trades).

edit: this isn't to say don't go to music school. if you can, go. if you can't, find a couple of musicians to tale you under their wing.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Jul 10, 2011,
#11
I took 12 years of my life putting it together in bits and pieces, finding no place that was suitable for understanding. It was miserable.

That's why Im so passionate about helping people, that want to learn. My own self taught way resulted in me being able to gain a different perspective and making some critical observations that formed the framework of what I teach today, and why what I teach and how I teach is unique, and in 26 years I have not found it replicated anywhere else.

(If you are a student of mine, you are welcome to weigh in, I ask you, have any of you seen what I teach anywhere else, as far as how I teach?)

By the way I appreciate the sentiment, but believe me I am no better than anyone else here. Lots of guys have their theory down here very well, too many to count. Thanks for the compliment but it's not merited in my opinion.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 10, 2011,
#13
We all learnt it from Alan. I'm not sure if you know this but he actually invented music theory.

Edit: Wait until you're older to get books? Theory books aren't x rated... At least the ones I own. Not so sure about those ones Griff reads.
Last edited by Jesse Clarkson at Jul 10, 2011,
#15
Books from the library and the web. To be a bit more specific, I got stuff from here in MT, musictheory.net, some Wikipeida, Andrew Wasson (link in my sig, awesome teacher).
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#16
Quote by Jesse Clarkson
Theory books aren't x rated...


Don't go mixing music theory and porno: all As will start looking like A-flats if you know what I mean... .

I learned from the Internet and books. I wouldn't recommend it unless you have infinite patience and a very critical mind. There's a ton of bad information out there, but if you have a solid understanding of the fundamentals, you'll be able to pick through it pretty well: incorrect information has a way of not being all-around consistent.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#17
School, books, here in MT, musictheory.net largely.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#18
Quote by Jesse Clarkson
We all learnt it from Alan. I'm not sure if you know this but he actually invented music theory.


It's true. You wouldn't believe how frustrating it is arguing about something that for all purposes wouldn't exist without me. It's like arguing with god over the bible.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#19
I started from the basics when I had just turned 17 and worked through the ABRSM theory workbooks from grade 1-7. I was pretty obsessed with it though, every day I'd be reading Eric Taylor on the bus to and from college. I had my music teacher to ask for help too, which is always good to clear things up. I also did music in college, and I've just finished my first year of University.

Books I'd reccomend:

The AB guide to Music Theory - Part I (get the ABRSM workbooks to go with it, when you get to grade 5... get the part II book)

Harmony - Anna Butterworth

First species counterpoint - Learn from either the Fux book (if you can stand the stupid dialogue between the student and Fux ), or the Piston/Schoenberg books. Learning first species when you start will give you more options when you want to harmonize something in your songs instead of just harmonizing in parallels.

Once you have the basics down you can start working your way though books which would seem a bit too academic at first:

Harmony - Walter Piston
Structural Functions of Harmony - Schoenberg
Counterpoint - Fux
The Harmony of Bill Evans - Jack Reilly
(I don't really know much about Jazz, as someone like Pillo144 or Mike Dodge for recommendations)
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jul 11, 2011,
#20
I'm not sure but when I did my grade 5 I got 16/17 for that part.I approached it like this:


Mark in cadences/chord progression (usually it's just chords ii V and I)

identify the motifs, see which bits you can develop

Try and hear it in your head
#21
I never got mine back, just a summary sheet. Maybe you could request them back though.

I've done grade 7, I'm currently working through the grade 8 book.

Grade 6 is Realizing basic figured bass for either voices or keyboards, Indicating appropriate chords for the accompaniment of a 8 bar melody, composition of a baroque melody and questions on short extracts of music

grade 7 is figuring a bass line to include suspensions and passing notes, re-writing a passage from a chorale or Classical keyboard work to include suspensions and notes of melodic decoration, Continuation of a melody for a specified instrument, and again questions on extracts.
#22
I LIKED the dialogue between Fux and his pupil!

Some day I'd like to check out the AB Guide, I've never seen it, I feel like I've seen just about everything else, though!

@carnage Yes I have an Academy. It was a natural outgrowth to the success of the lessons program I have here. The online portion came years later when I hit critical mass here.

I will add, I never set out to become a teacher or have an Academy. Both seem to have been something of a calling for me, that I just ended up doing this.

Sean
#23
Quote by griffRG7321
First species counterpoint - Learn from either the Fux book (if you can stand the stupid dialogue between the student and Fux )


but can you explain to me what is meant by the first species of counterpoint?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#24
Quote by AeolianWolf
but can you explain to me what is meant by the first species of counterpoint?


Harmonizing a line without dissonances, so thirds, sixths and fifths.
#25
The easiest-access resource I've found is The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory. It explains everything in an easy-to-understand way, and the information is accurate, if the definition of accurate is "the same as what my professor, who has a doctorate in the subject, says."

I learned the rest my music theory from a class at a local community college. I'm not sure what the community colleges are like in your area, but at mine, you can get in as long as you're over the age of 14, and you don't have to take more than one class if you don't want to. The professor was really knowledgeable and fun to work with, and I learned a lot - including ear training. (Sight singing, identifying chord qualities and intervals, etc.)
Last edited by pianoforte95 at Jul 12, 2011,
#28
I don't remember where I learned most of what I learned. I went through a good lot of the standard university texts which filled in the holes and showed me the more interesting stuff, however.
#29
Quote by griffRG7321
Harmonizing a line without dissonances, so thirds, sixths and fifths.


is that fux's reply?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#30
Quote by AeolianWolf
is that fux's reply?


I didn't get the joke, I though you were questioning whether I knew what first species counterpoint was.

...Errrm I mean...

"With God's help, then, let us begin composition for two voices"
#32
No but now I will

Edit: Now I can't take Fux seriously
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jul 12, 2011,