#2
One generally plays music on guitar, so I can see why music knowledge would come in handy.

Standard tuning is mostly in 4ths as well, which is handy.
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#3
At the very least, it will help you identify key signatures. If I gave you a sheet with a key signature of two sharps, what key(s) could the music be in?
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#4
Quote by soviet_ska
At the very least, it will help you identify key signatures. If I gave you a sheet with a key signature of two sharps, what key(s) could the music be in?

*Raises hand*
G major, for one.
EDIT: Yes I am an idiot, it's past midnight so I can't think right. I'm going to sleep. Trolololol me all you want, I deserve it.
Last edited by Skullivan at Jul 11, 2011,
#5
To figure out what notes are sharp or flat in a given major key, to find its relative minor, to find the basic 1 4 5 chords (among others) of the given major key to improvise. It has a lPt of possibities.
#8
Quote by Dayn
One generally plays music on guitar, so I can see why music knowledge would come in handy.

This.
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#9
Quote by soviet_ska
At the very least, it will help you identify key signatures. If I gave you a sheet with a key signature of two sharps, what key(s) could the music be in?


Two sharps, then its D major/b minor. Do I get a cookie for being right?

OT: The circle of fifths is usualful because backwards its the circle of forths which is what guitars in E standard are based on. It helps with soloing and chord progression designing.
#10
Quote by amonamarthmetal
Not sure if srs...


I am an idiot, I meant D major, again,
I think I'll make myself a mini facepalm stack for how stupid I am

#11
Quote by Thesmartkid
Two sharps, then its D major/b minor. Do I get a cookie for being right?


Either cookies or props, but not both!

EDIT: Haha, way to live up to your name!
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#12
Quote by amonamarthmetal
To figure out what notes are sharp or flat in a given major key, to find its relative minor, to find the basic 1 4 5 chords (among others) of the given major key to improvise. It has a lPt of possibities.


how would I figure out WHICH notes are sharp or flat? All I can see is HOW many sharps or flats a certain key has. 1 4 5 chords? Dont u mean 1 3 5?
#13
Starting from C Major, every fifth up adds another sharp. The new sharp in each key is the note that is a half-step below the root. example: C has no sharps. G has 1 sharp - F#. D has two sharps - F# and C#. A has 3 sharps - F# C# and G#, and so on. If you know the circle, you can quickly tell how many sharps or flats in any key.
#14
Quote by Dig_a_Pony
how would I figure out WHICH notes are sharp or flat? All I can see is HOW many sharps or flats a certain key has. 1 4 5 chords? Dont u mean 1 3 5?


The order of sharps: F C G D A E B

The order of flats is reversed.

Ninja'd.... again.
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Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#15
Okay from what you guys have told me I get it now! Thanks! So to find WHICH notes of a scale are sharp, you just look two notes away from the note you started on the circle, so like u guys said : For a G it would be 2 notes back , an F , which you make sharp. Then on to D it would be an F and a C which you make sharp and so on.
#16
The 1 4 5 chords are the basics of chord progressions if you are in c major go counterclockwise Once to get the 4 chord which is F and to get the 5 chord go clockwise over one from Cto get G
Last edited by amonamarthmetal at Jul 11, 2011,
#17
Quote by Dig_a_Pony
1 4 5 chords? Dont u mean 1 3 5?


To add to the guy above, 1 3 5 is the basic triad for forming chords, but the first, fourth, and fifth actual chords in relation to the key are the most common in progressions.

Ex. In C major, the chords are I ii iii IV V vi vii(dim), or CM dm em FM GM am bdim. A I IV V chord progression would, thereby, be CM FM GM.

Kinda complex for starting out, but that's about the simplest I'd be able to make it without skipping important info.
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#18
Quote by Dig_a_Pony
I've been learning about the circle of fifths now and I'm having a hard time getting why it's useful for guitar?


It depends. I see the Co5 as having limited use. If you want to use it to figure out a key signature. You can also use it to figure out what notes in a major scale are #/b.

The largest benefit I found was when studying Jazz with Jimmy Bruno, using it to practice in all 12 keys, using the Co5 order, made it easy to switch and transition through keys on the spot when improvising leads, like Satin Doll or Blue Bossa, and sounding musical. It because of tremendous use then.

Personally, I think of it as one of those things that people learn because some book seems to think it's important. In 26 years I have yet to have run across much that merited the hype, until I started working with Jazz Improvisation.

Best,

Sean