#1
Just been to pick up a new guitar, well it's really old but new to me!.
Won it on a well known auction site for a VERY low amount...

So it's a Kawai Acoustic (no.631 to be exact).

From researching it up.. japanese made - seems to be parent company of teisco..
Could've been made from late 60's to late 70's..

Anyway here are some pics and some advice is needed.














Problems:
The action is UNPLAYABLE...
From looking at the pics of the bridge i suspect a new saddle/bridge has been fitted at some point.. making the action unbearably high and really awkward...

The tuners are ancient, but usable i guess..


From strumming a few open chords on it, it sounds pretty good.. but there is buzzing and all sorts of intonation problems..


With the bridge, due to the tailpiece, is there any way i can lower the action and so forth?


Oh and.. i'm living at home in the box room for the summer so ignore the paint hahaha
#2
i may be wrong but it looks like the neck is really bowed...could just be the pic though
#3
the neck is slightly bowed, ive played others with bowed necks..

any ideas how i can make the bridge more playable?
#4
well if you straighten the neck out that would probably help, then if you need to shave the saddle down you can do that, you might be able to get it to play well but it might be a lost cause

you should just google this stuff
#6
Yip i had one of those donkies years ago. I am sure that bridge doesnt belong there, being that
its made for pins.
Does it have an adjustable neck or is it set. Mine had a truss rod although i never needed to use it.
Looking at the neck it makes you wonder whether its been stored with the strings tensioned.
Mine played reasonable but i got rid of it. Life is to short to play shit guitars.
Cheers.
#7
Holy high action Batman!

Damn... My acoustic came with some pretty high action but that's the sort of height you'd want for slide or something! Dayum.
#8
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
Holy high action Batman!

Damn... My acoustic came with some pretty high action but that's the sort of height you'd want for slide or something! Dayum.



nope not at all!
any tips how to get it nice and low?
#9
Quote by tuxs
Does it have an adjustable neck or is it set.


This. If you can turn the truss rod slowly to counter some of the bowing, that'd be good. You shouldn't generally go straight to the truss rod to handle action issues, but the problem here is clearly with the neck.
#10
Quote by beab
This. If you can turn the truss rod slowly to counter some of the bowing, that'd be good. You shouldn't generally go straight to the truss rod to handle action issues, but the problem here is clearly with the neck.


what else can i look at first/after?
#11
Quote by daverichards
what else can i look at first/after?


I'd look at getting the nut and potentially the bridge filed down a bit. I presume you're going to be replacing the strings - if it were mine, my initial step would be to carefully detune the strings slowly then remove them, adjust the truss rod to correct the bowing, then look at the nut, followed by the bridge.

That said, I am definitely not a luthier - a professional set-up in this case is probably a worthwhile investment if this kind of thing is a bit unusual for you. Which, no offense, I'm guessing is the case, seeing as you're asking about it
#12
seriously dude, you should just take it in to a guitar tech guy and have a full setup on it. Well worth the price you will pay because it will play as awesome as it can after.

The neck does need a bit of work, and the bridge needs some work too. Also possibly the nut. If you do not have the know-how to get those pieces where you want and need them then it's time to turn to a professional. Pros will definitely be able to get that up and running in no time.

Edit: I would not even attempt any of that work. I'd pack up the guitar and bring it to a shop asap.
Last edited by mkocian17 at Jul 12, 2011,
#13
The "trapeze" tailpiece is not original; that's a pin bridge. So you might want to wonder why someone put it on there? Damage perhaps?
The neck is severely bowed. You may be able to adjust this out with the truss rod, but you'll need to go slow. Best to have a tech do it.
Only after the neck is straightened will you be able to assess the action and s ee if it needs adjustment.
#14
Quote by Bikewer
The "trapeze" tailpiece is not original; that's a pin bridge. So you might want to wonder why someone put it on there? Damage perhaps?
The neck is severely bowed. You may be able to adjust this out with the truss rod, but you'll need to go slow. Best to have a tech do it.
Only after the neck is straightened will you be able to assess the action and s ee if it needs adjustment.



yeh i've another on the web the same, with the stock bridge etc..

my plan is to clean up the neck and put some cleaner/treatment on it then go about the truss (have a friend far more experienced with truss' than myself)

any idea how much techs would charge?
#15
I suspect that the reason a trapeze bridge was applied is that the original bridge started to come unglued. That's about the only reason I can think of, and it's pretty common. Re-gluing the bridge, if that's the case, is not a big deal. However, you really should have a luthier do it as they would have the special clamps required.
If it were me, I'd remove the strings and check that, as well as examining the interior of the guitar with one of those automotive mirror tools.
Then, I'd very slowly and carefully try to use the truss rod to straighten the neck.
Like, perhaps one quarter turn every couple of days for a week or so. There is always the danger of breaking the truss rod on a job like this and then it's pretty much toast....Or a good slide guitar.
#16
ya it's probably good to get a luthier to do all this stuff but then before you know it you may have spent enough cash that could have gotten you a better new guitar

but maybe not