#1
Hi everybody, I'm not new in music theory, but I can't find anything that suits me well, so I thought that you could help me

I'm looking for "dark" music scales (or maybe modes?). I tried to examine different dark-ish songs from my music library but it didn't help me much: some songs, from a strict "melodical" pov, were just a minor scale with a shitload of effects throwed in, while others had interesting passages (ie: Fall of Troy) but I can't get what lies behind.

Any help is welcome
#2
The diminished scale can tend to give a slightly dark, or outside tonality to a piece.
#3
Yes I know that it has been made for this specific reason but I think it tends to make you play the usual overheard transition (6-8-7-6b) without many interesting variations.. Probably it's just me, but I was looking for something a bit more original.

I tried to compose something interely by ear, and even if I can make a weird riff (or chord progression) work it's hard to link it to other parts, and I guess that some theorical suggestion could make the work smoother.
#4
It isn't true until it's on BBC News >.>

Edit: What the hell, wrong tab Sorry people, this post it totally irrelevant. If mods can delete posts, then go ahead
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Last edited by HeretiK538 at Jul 11, 2011,
#5
Quote by HeretiK538
It isn't true until it's on BBC News >.>



explain that to a non-uk based user
#6
BBC News is superior to all other news sources It was supposed to be in a post about a cure for AIDS being found, in a thread in the pit. I don't know how this happened Anyway, I'll stop posting here before I spam up this thread any more
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#8
Quote by electroMakumba
..have you ever tried to write a dark song using G, Bm, D? lol


A challenge? I reckon I could:
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Quote by electroMakumba
GO GO GO


lol this could be interesting

anyone in?


Do the chords have to be in that order?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
Quote by electroMakumba
GO GO GO


lol this could be interesting

anyone in?

I can try. I won't promise anything though

If you want a dark sound, look for dissonance. Minor seconds, diminished fifths and major sevenths are some of my favorites. Maybe try minor major seventh chords (1 b3 5 7).
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#13
Quote by electroMakumba
No.. well, dunno, do you have other suggestions?


I was just asking for rules, choose what you think is right.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#15
Quote by electroMakumba
Hi everybody, I'm not new in music theory, but I can't find anything that suits me well, so I thought that you could help me

I'm looking for "dark" music scales (or maybe modes?). I tried to examine different dark-ish songs from my music library but it didn't help me much: some songs, from a strict "melodical" pov, were just a minor scale with a shitload of effects throwed in, while others had interesting passages (ie: Fall of Troy) but I can't get what lies behind.

Any help is welcome

Well, in my opinion, its not the scales, but the underlaying progression. Try, while in a minor key, using the vi instead of VI, so say in Cminor, go C minor to Abminor, it has a dark sound in my opinion. The melodies can help with this as well, Just experiment a bit
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#17
Quote by carnagereap666
*ahem

Harmonic Minor
Aeolian (minor scale)
Locrian
Chromatic
Phrygian
Phrygian Dominant
Dorian
Hungarian Minor


Err, why not just say chromatic and ignore the rest? It is EVERY note, so all the rest could be included within it.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#18
Well, a certain pattern of intervals equates to a certain scale. The chromatic scale uses every note and technically contains every scale, but you don't use it like that. It has it's own specific sound just as Locrian and Dorian do. But to answer your question: I didn't just say Chromatic because someone might not be able to find the exact sound they want with ease. People found an appeasing pattern of tones and labeled them as a certain scale. That's way I didn't just say chromatic scale.
#19
A very simple way to achieve darkness is to play in a major key and then switch to it's own natural minor. Example: In Creep by Radiohead, the progression is G B C Cm. The switch from C to Cm is incredibly dark. Shows what moving just one note can do for the mood.
#20
Quote by carnagereap666
Well, a certain pattern of intervals equates to a certain scale. The chromatic scale uses every note and technically contains every scale, but you don't use it like that. It has it's own specific sound just as Locrian and Dorian do. But to answer your question: I didn't just say Chromatic because someone might not be able to find the exact sound they want with ease. People found an appeasing pattern of tones and labeled them as a certain scale. That's way I didn't just say chromatic scale.


But the chromatic scale embodies all and every scale anyway, you just have to approach it in a certain way.

It's the ultimate illustration that it's not the scales themselves that achieve a sound, but note selection and use within the context of the song.

Edit: However I would have understood if you didn't say chromatic at all, as it can be challenging for beginners to relate to.
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#21
Isnt that song in G major with B major borrowed from the parallel minor and the Cm to creat a chromatic run? (E>Eb>D)?
#22
Chromatic is good but it comes handy when doing solos, while it's useless when you look at it in a melodic pov.

Thank you carnage, I will try your suggestions


FOR THE GUYS WHO TOOK THE CONTEST THING SERIOUSLY:
I think we must set some rules to the instruments we can use.. I assume that we all play guitar, so we could use it to record percussion-ish sound and use them as drums. We have enough to build a decent rhythm track, but I don't know what else to allow.
#24
Quote by electroMakumba
Chromatic is good but it comes handy when doing solos, while it's useless when you look at it in a melodic pov.

Thank you carnage, I will try your suggestions


FOR THE GUYS WHO TOOK THE CONTEST THING SERIOUSLY:
I think we must set some rules to the instruments we can use.. I assume that we all play guitar, so we could use it to record percussion-ish sound and use them as drums. We have enough to build a decent rhythm track, but I don't know what else to allow.


Sure thing, perhaps some people could use their suggested scales over this progression so they can illustrate how they use them to achieve a dark sound.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#25
Quote by electroMakumba
Chromatic is good but it comes handy when doing solos, while it's useless when you look at it in a melodic pov.


You can make fully-chromatic melodies. You can even make them inside a tonal, key-centered context.
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#26
Quote by AlanHB
Sure thing, perhaps some people could use their suggested scales over this progression so they can illustrate how they use them to achieve a dark sound.



Allrite then.. we can start


@soviet_ska: You're right, but those melodies are probably very "delicate" and not easy to deal with.. Which is what I'm trying to learn.