Poll: Are studios still relevant?
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View poll results: Are studios still relevant?
They are still relevant
29 85%
They are things of the past
5 15%
Voters: 34.
#1
Recording gear is as affordable as ever. You can record and mix a pro level album in the comfort of your own room...

It seems as though the more people go this route, the classic recording studio with all the expensive gear and costs will become obsolete.

However, I have a dream one day of building, owning and operating my own full fledged studio- By means of slowly accumulating enough gear of my own and eventually renting my services out to other musicians for profit.

The thought of doing this thrills me, but I can't see the use of a huge studio if everyone is cutting albums in their homes.

So are these recording studios a thing of the past?

EDIT: Poll up for prespective
Last edited by E7#9 at Jul 11, 2011,
#2
No. There's always going to be someone (myself included, most likely) who like the convenience and professional mix you get with a studio. Recording is a daunting thing to learn for the uninitiated like myself. Besides, most of the big bands and a lot of the smaller ones who may know about recording still choose to go into the studio.

Way I see it, and I imagine others see it, too, is that you can spend thousands upon thousands on equipment and many hours learning how to use it, or you can go into a quick and dirty studio run to get several usable takes in much less time, often with a better result.
#3
Making a good quality recording requires two things: good recording equipment and knowing how to use it. It's easier and easier to come by good equipment as the technology for less expensive, higher quality digital gear advances. However, if you don't know how to use it, you're not going to be able to make as good a product on your own.

It has become the case that recordings are becoming more and more delocalized as people get more and more access to inexpensive high-quality recording equipment, but the expertise that it takes to really make that good a product is still in demand. Even though you can learn to do that stuff doesn't mean that you will or that you have time for it. Kind of like how home video cameras didn't kill Hollywood, home recording gear will not kill recording studios, I think.
#4
Sadly, it seems so. My heart was broken when I heard that Beartracks Studios closed. It was a goal of mine to record there and now it's impossible.

To be honest, I truly hope that studios don't become a thing of the past. There's something about having a dedicated place to record, write, and all-out CREATE music in. Having some shitty Guitar Center mixing board with your computer in the corner of your room is just stupid to me.

*sigh*
#5
You will need all the equipment, but the product you would be selling is your value as a mixer/producer. You may even have to diversify into marketing and promotion for up and coming bands. That is kind of like my goal - that is what I want to do by the time I'm 40, just want to run a studio, promote new bands, maybe help producing merchandise - whatever keeps me involved with music.
#6
Yes and no. You may be able to afford some decent equipment, but are you trained as a recording engineer? Do you have the training of a mastering engineer? So, while anyone can afford the gear, it's the knowing how to operate it that makes it all work.

The other thing you have to consider is that studios put a lot of money into room treatments, power filtering and other things that make a difference. How many home studios can afford to do all of this? How many home studios can afford several thousand dollar mics and mic preamps?

So, to answer your question... I do believe that recording studios are endangered, however I do believe there will always be a need for some. In other words, some will fail.
#7
No. Pro Studios aren't going anywhere soon. It's just like video editing. Now you can buy a full editing suite including a computer for under 5000 dollars. Even computers you buy new have some built in software. Just because everyone is editing videos and sticking them up on youtube doesn't mean the profession is going away. Why should music recording be any different?
#8
The Recording Engineer's Handbook specifically mentions that studios are endangered and that many have closed as a direct result of the home studio invasion. It's a very interesting book if you want to get into recording.

Here:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/159863867X/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=1932929002&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=193YG8VF6K2TP4CY4EK6
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Jul 11, 2011,
#9
Geldin you raise an interesting point... I like the analogy with the video camera and Hollwood. Gives me hope

But then again... I'm not quite sure you can compare films to music. To make a professional commercial album costs a few hundred thousand dollars... Films can easily cost 100 million dollars.

If we assume that amateur gear required for both media are arbirtrarily 40 times less than what the pros use, recording gear is much cheaper and more accesible to the general public. This might hurt the big studios

Hmm. after reading the other response not everyone shares the same opinion....
Last edited by E7#9 at Jul 11, 2011,
#10
I think ops post pretty much only covers bands 12-18 years old who can't afford to record in a studio with a professional engineer, too bad they can't mix for shit either and end up with a subpar product. Eventually people will get sick and tired of midi drums and want to record their real drums in a real studio.
#11
the day major studios decide a home studio is the way to go will be the death of recording studios...i dont see that happening soon. Home recordings just usually aren`t as good. I am a huge advocate of home recording, but you can tell when something is in a studio vs. home recording most of the time.
#12
Anyone can buy a bunch of fancy equipment, but it takes time and energy to learn how to properly use it all, and there are still plenty of people who would rather pay someone else to do it for them.

Edit: Just read through the thread, and this has basically already been said a bunch of times. Oh well.
Last edited by Alex Vik at Jul 12, 2011,
#13
Quote by Ascendant
I think ops post pretty much only covers bands 12-18 years old who can't afford to record in a studio with a professional engineer, too bad they can't mix for shit either and end up with a subpar product. Eventually people will get sick and tired of midi drums and want to record their real drums in a real studio.

Periphery. Nuff said.

They recorded all of their first album by themselves and I think it's a pretty good sound.
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#14
There is always a need for something.

A studio will provide me with a lot of things I don't have access to (High end gear, properly treated room and someone who knows what the **** they're doing). Though at the same time, it comes at a cost greater than what I feel like dishing out right now and limits my freedom to work when I want. Sure, I have nowhere near as nice of gear but for what I'm doing now, its perfect. Down the road when I'm making $$$ at music, it'll be worth investing in studio time. For now, my home studio works
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#15
well, me and my band are going to one on th 21st of july to record our first E.P, it wasnt hard to find one at all although while we were on a search for one we did hear of a few that had recently closed.
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#16
Quote by E7#9
Recording gear is as affordable as ever. You can record and mix a pro level album in the comfort of your own room...


I'd say you can get closer to a pro studio sound than you could 20 or even 10 years ago, the gap between pro studio and home studio is closing but there is definitely still a gap.

No matter what plug-ins you have, you're not going to be able to get as good of a sound as you would with decent high end outboard gear, balanced monitors in an acoustically treated room and someone with an ear good enough to pay for.

Also, you're never going to get pod fart or whatever to sound as good as a cranked tube amp that's recorded properly.

That's just my 2 cents I guess, but I definitely think there's a place for studios.
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#17
Depends on your definition of "recording studio"

Are the days of muli-room, multi-studio, giant analog boards gone? No. But they are on their way out. It's one of the reasons a ton of them are closing.

The definition of recording studio itself is changing as things go more ITB and we end up with producers buying a house and turning it into their studio.
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#18
The idea of recording studios being endangered is a load of bollocks.

Yeah sure, any hick can purchase Pro Tools, an Mbox, a 57 and they're off on their path to being able to record to a degree, but nothing can ever replace the ears.

Take guys like Mutt Lange and Mike Shipley, they're still busy all year round, in fact, they can pick and choose what they want to do. They have the ears and the skills to make sensational records, and are not in the slightest worried about "bedroom producers".

Nothing will ever replace a great room, with a group of great plays, going into great gear, recorded by a great engineer. That just can't be done in someones bedroom.
#19
Quote by oneblackened
Periphery. Nuff said.

They recorded all of their first album by themselves and I think it's a pretty good sound.

They used great quality drum sampling and the most expensive amp modelling money can buy. (Axe-FX) They also used guitars that cost thousands of pounds with great pick-ups, and really high quality monitors. It's not like some kids in a bedroom with a POD and EZdrummer.

Also, the key thing is experience. Most people want to play and make music, not learn how to record it. Misha had a decade of home recording experience behind him, and Cloudkicker has mentioned he used to record and produce local bands, which is where he got his recording knowledge from, and his recordings aren't the best, but are incredible for what he uses.

In response to the TS's question, basically what Alex Vik said. There's still a large amount of musicians who believe that you can get a pro-recording by just putting a mic in a room where the band in playing and use no processing. Once they realise that's bs then they'll go to someone who can record them properly.


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#20
Quote by Brendan.Clace
Depends on your definition of "recording studio"

Are the days of muli-room, multi-studio, giant analog boards gone? No. But they are on their way out. It's one of the reasons a ton of them are closing.

The definition of recording studio itself is changing as things go more ITB and we end up with producers buying a house and turning it into their studio.
This is something I could see.
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#21
Quote by oneblackened
Periphery. Nuff said.

They recorded all of their first album by themselves and I think it's a pretty good sound.

Yes because Misha actually knows what he's doing, that's not the case for 99% of bedroom warriors with their laptops and Line6 GX interface.