#1
Where should the motion come when hitting the drum with sticks? Wrist, fingers, a combination, or other? Anyone have any good articles to read or videos to watch? All of the vids I've seen so far only focus on holding the drum sticks, but not the mechanics of hitting with the stick.

Thank you.
Last edited by zincabopataurio at Jul 11, 2011,
#2
Just know 2 things:
1. You drum with your wrists. Not your arms. You use your fingers to hold onto the stick, and occassionally roll.
2. If you can't hear your guitarist, you're playing too loud.
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#3
Just know two things:

1. You actually drum with your whole body. There's a lot of motion involved in drumming, but as for the actual limbs, there's a number of techniques for hitting. I personally use mostly my fingers. For more power/showiness, you can use your whole arm.

2. If you can't hear the guitarist, consider telling him to turn himself up. Drums are loud by nature, and depending on the genre you're playing, they can sound pretty silly if you play them quietly. I personally advocate smacking them like a Viking wench.
#4
Quote by zincabopataurio
Where should the motion come when hitting the drum with sticks? Wrist, fingers, a combination, or other? Anyone have any good articles to read or videos to watch? All of the vids I've seen so far only focus on holding the drum sticks, but not the mechanics of hitting with the stick.

Thank you.
Depends, mostly wrists and fingers, if you're riding a crash cymbal then some arm motion is ok... anything fast will be only wrists and fingers, with more fingers getting incorporated into the motion as you get faster, for example 8th notes one hand at 300 bpm would be entirely fingers with no wrist involved.
#6
Thank you for the replys.

I have another question, should the stick be hitting the drum head perpendicular to the drumhead? I noticed I come at a slight angle, idk if this a bad habit or not.
#7
Whatever feels comfortable to you. I know some guys who prefer their toms high and at an angle because they feel more comfortable and can get their own maximum impact from it. I prefer mine to be flat and low to the snare, like travis barker. Personal preference and differing techniques basically.
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#8
Watch "Secret Weapon for the modern drummer" You can find it availble for free if you look hard enough. JoJo Mayer spends and hour in this video explaining and demonstrating the mohler technique. I play with my wrists mostly, but many instructors will tell you that speed comes from the smaller muscles in your fingers.

As for the striking angle of the stick, it should be as close to perpindicular as possible. That way you can "pull" the tone out of the drum while having the maximum rebound control. It is obviuosly not always possible, expecially with mounted toms, but your setup should allow for this as much as possible.
#9
^^ Agree'd, Secret Weapons for the Modern Drummer is probably the best DVD for hand technique around.
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#10
Learn to play some hand drums. A stick is just an extension of your hand.

A Djembe or Conga is an instrument where the sound depends on countless factors:

Where you hit the head
How hard you hit the head
Whether you use one finger (and which one!)... two fingers... three fingers...
..a knuckle...

Whether or not you let the note ring, or mute it (and when!)
Your attack - not just how hard you hit, but the acceleration involved in the hit
...a "smack!" verses a "THUMP!" is the same force with different acceleration

So on and so forth. A stick is used essentially the same way. You can hit those drums anywhere with any amount of force and vary the attack.

Actual technique depends on the style. Rock and blues are fairly simple/similar in terms of drumming - hit 3/4 as hard as possible dead-center with a quick attack.

Metal and Jazz are much more advanced and both involve a wider spectrum of hits and variations.

Jazz is probably the most complex with drummers hitting the drums with hands, sticks, brushes, mallets and more.

Percussion is the most intricate, varied and expressive instrument in the history of mankind.

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