#1
Hi there, I'm a noob at theory so forgive me, but I have a few chords that I like together, and would like to build off. I have an Am, but also I have another chord which I'm not sure the name of. The notes are F, A, D, E. First of all, how do I find out the name of this chord, and is there a website I can go to to punch in the notes? And second of all, how would I know what other chords would be in that same key that would go well with it? Thank you guys!
#2
Dsus2

i think
"The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted."
#3
that there is a Dmsus2
after that chord use an E7 and go back to the Am
My gear
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
B-52 LS100 Half Stack
Dunlop SW30 Slash Signature Wah
Digitech Hardwire CR-7 Stereo Chorus
Digitech Hardwire DL-8 Delay/Looper
Boss BD-2 Blues Driver
Fender CD220CE Acoustic
#4
Quote by DKMfreak410
that there is a Dmsus2
after that chord use an E7 and go back to the Am


How do you know that though? lol...
#5
Quote by DKMfreak410
that there is a Dmadd9

sus2 would imply the substitution of the minor third by the tonic's second degree. Since F is readily available, it must be an extension (so long as context dictates the chord is some variant of Dm).
If F is in the base as TS has written, we'd have the inversion Dmadd9/F.
Last edited by juckfush at Jul 11, 2011,
#6
Quote by truthbetold1984
Hi there, I'm a noob at theory so forgive me, but I have a few chords that I like together, and would like to build off. I have an Am, but also I have another chord which I'm not sure the name of. The notes are F, A, D, E. First of all, how do I find out the name of this chord, and is there a website I can go to to punch in the notes? And second of all, how would I know what other chords would be in that same key that would go well with it? Thank you guys!


I'd call it a Dm add 9 if the bass were in D

Sean
#9
The key can be determined by figuring out which note the progression resolves to, or by seeing which chord sounds 'final.'
...I like metal.