#1
I found this clip of an electronic guitar on the web and there seems to be some resentment about having an electronic-sort of guitar reading the comments I found.

http://www.youtube.com/user/misadigital#p/u/1/_SW_36OHNDw

What do you guys think of the electronic guitar?

For myself, I think it's great that there's a something like this. I've always wanted to experiment with electronic sort of synth music, problem is that most of this stuff I've have to have some rudimentary piano knowledge, which unfortunately I have none.

I think it's pretty neat. I mean it won't replace the guitar of course, but it really complements it
#3
Quote by Duffman123
It's pointless imo, it's a lot easier to just play a synth.



Because synths aren't modeled after a real instrument or anything

Quote by EndTheRapture51
hard sciences don't have correct and incorrect answers actually
Last edited by StewieSwan at Jul 12, 2011,
#4
I love that lick he does. Sounds electric guitarish but still retains it's electronica attributes. I like it

(Too bad you cant bend or whammy anything though)
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#5
Quote by StewieSwan
Because synths aren't modeled after a real instrument or anything
*piano


The reason it was modeled on a piano was because it's as close to pushing a button and getting sound as you can get, and the shape of the 'buttons' allow for fluent playing.

If you make an electronic guitar you may as well make an electronic bassoon. They're both pointless.
#6
Quote by spitonastranger
The reason it was modeled on a piano was because it's as close to pushing a button and getting sound as you can get, and the shape of the 'buttons' allow for fluent playing.

If you make an electronic guitar you may as well make an electronic bassoon. They're both pointless.

You mean like the Eigenharp?
#7
Quote by Alex Vik
You mean like the Eigenharp?



P-p-p-pwnt


And holy shit, they're way cheaper than I expected. I might just have to buy one..
Quote by EndTheRapture51
hard sciences don't have correct and incorrect answers actually
#8
Quote by spitonastranger
The reason it was modeled on a piano was because it's as close to pushing a button and getting sound as you can get, and the shape of the 'buttons' allow for fluent playing.

If you make an electronic guitar you may as well make an electronic bassoon. They're both pointless.


I think the point is for guitarists who can't play the keyboard, aren't interested in learning, but like experimental music.
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#9
Sorry buck, I don't think the basson is exactly something to consider a "modern" instrument. This can be debated as what feels better as much as the classic "Tube vs SS vs Digital" argument.

Nothing will ever lose it's place as long as it's used properly (sans: acoustic metal band, I never want to touch an acoustic after seeing that crap)
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Ibanez ARX 350
Dunlop 535Q
Ibanez TS9
Peavey TransTube Supreme
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#10
Quote by Bushinarin
I think the point is for guitarists who can't play the keyboard, aren't interested in learning, but like experimental music.

And if you threw the right combo of effects pedals on a guitar, you'd get the same basic effect with ability to bend and do vibrato.
#11
Quote by StewieSwan
Because synths aren't modeled after a real instrument or anything


Your point being?
#12
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
And if you threw the right combo of effects pedals on a guitar, you'd get the same basic effect with ability to bend and do vibrato.



You can bend and vibrato on it and the software is open-source, which means you can create your own tones or download tones other people have made.


Quote by Duffman123
Your point being?



I'm not going to spoon-feed you. It's pretty obvious to anyone with a brain what my point was.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
hard sciences don't have correct and incorrect answers actually
Last edited by StewieSwan at Jul 12, 2011,
#13
We already had a thread on this, blind boy


And we already came to a conclusion that it's an expensive piece of shit that's pointless
#14
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
And if you threw the right combo of effects pedals on a guitar, you'd get the same basic effect with ability to bend and do vibrato.


"Baawww... People have different preferences than me".

That's essentially what I'm hearing from a lot of you.
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#15
Quote by Bushinarin
I think the point is for guitarists who can't play the keyboard, aren't interested in learning, but like experimental music.


Exactly.

I could learn how to play piano, but the problem is I would still have trouble relating the intervals that I learned from the guitar to the keys onto a piano. :/


For $849, it's not too bad.
Last edited by RockettBoy at Jul 12, 2011,
#16
I think it's pretty cool. Looks like fun to play it.

Is it practical, though? Maybe not. And it looks like you'd end up pressing the touch screen anyway. Why wouldn't you just learn to play the keyboard?

Edit: Oh God. That riff that he was playing is now stuck in my head.
Last edited by triface at Jul 12, 2011,
#17
Quote by StewieSwan
I'm not going to spoon-feed you. It's pretty obvious to anyone with a brain what my point was.

Not really no.
#18
Quote by StewieSwan
Because synths aren't modeled after a real instrument or anything


The keyboard was only chosen because it was familiar.

Some people, like Don Buchla, preferred (and still prefer) using new methods of controlling synths.

I mean, the first synths were monophonic. Are keyboards monophonic? No, they're fully polyphonic.
#19
Quote by Holy Katana
The keyboard was only chosen because it was familiar.

Some people, like Don Buchla, preferred (and still prefer) using new methods of controlling synths.

I mean, the first synths were monophonic. Are keyboards monophonic? No, they're fully polyphonic.



Not really sure why you directed this at me.


Quote by RockettBoy
Exactly.

I could learn how to play piano, but the problem is I would still have trouble relating the intervals that I learned from the guitar to the keys onto a piano. :/


For $849, it's not too bad.


It's $960 USD
Quote by EndTheRapture51
hard sciences don't have correct and incorrect answers actually
#20
Because the control surface of a synth has little to do with what it is. In most cases, synths do not sound anything like existing keyboard instruments. There are certainly patches that do, but it's a small number compared to the other sounds.

Anyway, it's too expensive for me. There are cheaper ways to control a synth with a guitar {or guitar-inspired controller}.
#21
Quote by Holy Katana
Because the control surface of a synth has little to do with what it is. In most cases, synths do not sound anything like existing keyboard instruments. There are certainly patches that do, but it's a small number compared to the other sounds.



I know. I think you misunderstood. I was making a point to the guy saying it's pointless to model a synth after anything but a piano, since the piano is still just another instrument. Keyboard synths have advantages, and this kitara synth will have its advantages.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
hard sciences don't have correct and incorrect answers actually