#1
So.. I bought this A pick/necklace from a concert.. Thing is it is not made of plastic like normal picks.. it is metal.. would metal be a reliable pick-material? will it cause problems when playing??
#2
I'm pretty sure it will damage your strings.
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Jim Dunlop Max Grip Carbon Jazz III
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#3
Quote by Gryphon999
I'm pretty sure it will damage your strings.

Not really. It may affect a bit their durability, but not much.

I've used coins as picks in the past, and i know a couple of guys who use them on a regular basis, without a problem.
It will give you a different sound, it's a matter of taste.

Furthermore, even Dunlop has some metal picks:
- stainless steel picks;
- nickel silver thumbpicks;
- nickel silver fingerpicks;
- brass fingerpicks.
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#5
A friend of mine uses one with no worries. It's useful for getting a different style of sound out of strings if you run them along the strings instead of picking (eg. Tom Morello)
#6
I have a metal pick, and it's alright. It creates a bit of a different sound, but it clings to the string. Also the paint on it comes off all over the pickups on my guitar.
#7
The Pixies used metal picks when recording Surfer Rosa. Considering how often you should change strings, it's not going to degrade them enough to be a problem. I've used one off and on for the decade I've been playing without a care. The only issues I foresee would be you getting used to the rigidity and its effect on your tone/strings. I might be wrong.
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Last edited by DanTheHobbit at Jul 12, 2011,
#8
Metal picks users are rare, but they're definetly out there -> probably because it produces a brighter sound or because the harsher pick attack adds more "bite" to your sound or something like that (I know that's why Brian May stuck with it). If I'm not mistaken the manufacturers of these types of picks use steel almost exclusively

Yes, the strings wear out faster and you'll scratch the pickguard / damage the finish and/or wood on your guitar much faster when your right hand slips (which I promise will happen sooner or later)

Also, if that pick is meant as a necklace you should keep in mind that using it for actual playing will cause scratching and (depending on how thick it is) perhaps denting. If you don't mind that then by all means use it, but if you want it to look all brand new and shiny I suggest you stick to plastic picks

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Last edited by shwilly at Jul 12, 2011,
#9
Brian May uses a sixpence and Rev. Willy uses a peso. I use a Dava control pick, which is a plastic grip holding a nickel silver tip. Great for digging in really hard for lead work.
#10
can't that demagnetize your pickups or something?
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#11
Quote by nutinpwnsgibson
can't that demagnetize your pickups or something?

This makes absolutely no sense.
#12
Quote by shwilly
Metal picks users are rare, but they're definetly out there -> probably because it produces a brighter sound or because the harsher pick attack adds more "bite" to your sound or something like that (I know that's why Brian May stuck with it). If I'm not mistaken the manufacturers of these types of picks use steel almost exclusively

Yes, the strings wear out faster and you'll scratch the pickguard / damage the finish and/or wood on your guitar much faster when your right hand slips (which I promise will happen sooner or later)

Also, if that pick is meant as a necklace you should keep in mind that using it for actual playing will cause scratching and (depending on how thick it is) perhaps denting. If you don't mind that then by all means use it, but if you want it to look all brand new and shiny I suggest you stick to plastic picks


Brian May used a sixpence, and it smooths out the sound a lot, i don't know where you're getting his use of a sixpence as bright as a metal pick
#13
I have, and use, all four from "Ice Pix". Got the necklace one too, just so I always have one with me. There is copper (thin), brass (thick), and steel (thick and thin). The thick steel (necklace) makes the most difference. It has a real noticeable difference in tone and attack. With that thick one you have, it should be very slightly concave (convex, depending on side ). Turn it and use angles of attack to change the "bite". As for damaging to strings..... well, only if you're prone to tearing up strings in the first place.


http://www.ice-pix.com/
Last edited by IbanezBossShred at Jul 12, 2011,
#15
I'm fairly certain that metal picks are aimed mainly at bass players, because of the thicker strings.
#16
I've tried playing with a metal pick in the past and didn't like it. It's harder to hold and doesn't feel right. And I use reallyyyyyy thick picks, so it can't be that.
#17
so.. it is good then.. since i am comfortable with the pick.. btw.. when saying adding a bite to the sound? any good examples for that?
#19
The two problems I forsee with metal picks, especially if they are steel picks, is extreme wear on your strings, steel against nickle, steel wins, and will eventually tear them up.

Second problem, get it too close to a hot pickup, like say, BKP Warpig, and the pickup magnet will catch that sucker if you don't have a good grip on it.
#21
Quote by darkwolf291
You mean they don't use nonferrous steel like surgical steel to prevent that from happening?


Idk, the only kind of nonferrous steel I know of is pure stainless steel, but it's usually very soft. Surgical steel is still magnetic, it's a combination of 440 Stainless and carbon steel.
#23
Quote by darkwolf291
You mean they don't use nonferrous steel like surgical steel to prevent that from happening?



And the winner gets a cookie, yes sir, that is correct. The steel picks are stainless, and the copper uses beryllium for hardening without making it magnetic, and of course brass. As for tearing up the strings, oh yeah, they are harder on strings than plastics, but then again, so is a 2.0MM pick over a .50MM pick . As for the "bite", sorry, no good example from me, just going on personal experience there....
#24
The ice pix I have are stainless steel and brass. Neither are attracted to magnets as far as I can tell, and they definitely aren't magnetic themselves, so it seems seriously unlikely that they could degauss the pickups even if they were impure and slightly paramagnetic. I've got another pick that's silver, which is diamagnetic, but the effect on the pickup would be miniscule.

Unless you're using a bar magnet to pick, I can't possibly imagine how a metal pick would weaken a pickup magnet.
#25
I use wirething picks, which have a metal point. Great for getting a more defined tone compared to other pick materials and they last for a long time.
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