#1
multi effects units? the tone is a bit digitalized but everything sounds "cleaner" and i get less noise...this changes when i plug into a distortion pedal, notes dont sound as smooth or as clear as the multi effects unit, sounds sloppier but more natural though
why is that?
#2
You basically outlined the pros and cons of Analog vs. Digital effects. Digital will always be clearer, but distortion is supposed to be noisy, not sterile IMHO. I'd take an analog pedal over a multi FX any day. You'll eventually get bored of most of the weird effects, leaving you with the ones that would sound better if they were coming from their own pedal
#3
i agree with you, i sold my digitech multi effects unit and got an analog pedal instead, but last night i jammed with a guy playing a Boss GT-8 and his notes came out clearer, esp at fast licks...while it wasnt easy for me to clear them out, he didnt seem to have a problem, and i remembered i didnt have a problem when i had my digitech

does this mean its easier to shred with multi FX pedals? isnt there a way i could get better clarity out of the analog pedals?
#5
Quote by eatfresh1736
If you have a good amp with higher wattage, you can push your pedals farther without getting too much noise. The amp makes a big difference



what about pickups? do they make a difference?
#6
Quote by Alijonroth
what about pickups? do they make a difference?


Yes, but not as big as you would hope.

You tend to need to use less gain with anologue stuff aswell. You might dime a dist pedal for practice, but you'd never dime a big tube amp
ProTone Pedals: Attack Overdrive
Fractal Audio: AxeFX 2
Engl: Fireball 60
Zilla: Fatboy 2x12
Carvin: DC700
Carvin: Vader 7
Schecter: KM-7 MKii
Schecter: Banshee 8 Passive
Jackson: DK2M
#7
analog distortion tends to be much more sensitive to things like your picking attack etc. as mentioned the dynamics also change especially with a tube amp. the sound can vary a little unlike a digital effect which remains constant.
#9
I used to use nothing but the multi-FX pedal, but I've since switched to direct amp play. Sounds way better.
#10
Quote by monwobobbo
analog distortion tends to be much more sensitive to things like your picking attack etc. as mentioned the dynamics also change especially with a tube amp. the sound can vary a little unlike a digital effect which remains constant.



so isnt there a way to get the best of both words? like make the analog distortion sound more controlled?
#11
Quote by Alijonroth
so isnt there a way to get the best of both words? like make the analog distortion sound more controlled?



I always play with the distortion from my guitar amp, and whenever i find it uncontrollable i just lower the gain or add a noise supressor. I don't really know why but i tend to find the digitally processed sounds less controllable etc. than real tube tones.

But when playing with distortion pedals the amp you plug it in to really means alot!

Try playing around with the EQ may help you aswell.

Otherwise you can try clean up your playing, i dont know if that can be the problem :P
Last edited by ZoaL at Jul 12, 2011,
#12
Quote by Alijonroth
so isnt there a way to get the best of both words? like make the analog distortion sound more controlled?


there are a few ways. the first is to use higher quality components to achieve the distorted tone. because higher quality bits are inherently more consistent, they respond in a more consistent and therefore more controlled manner.

amp wattage. a 100watt head doesn't have to work as hard to produce high volume levels whereas a lower wattage head will really need to work. amps working hard tend to be very touchy, so a higher watt amp played at a reasonable level (not too quiet or it'll sound thin) will produce a more controlled sound.

the easiest thing though, is to use a solid-state booster, like a tubescreamer to push the amp a little harder. this will allow you to have lots of drive without having to push the amp terribly hard. the end result is that the amp becomes somewhat more controllable while you still get enough gain.
#13
Quote by krehzeekid
there are a few ways. the first is to use higher quality components to achieve the distorted tone. because higher quality bits are inherently more consistent, they respond in a more consistent and therefore more controlled manner.

amp wattage. a 100watt head doesn't have to work as hard to produce high volume levels whereas a lower wattage head will really need to work. amps working hard tend to be very touchy, so a higher watt amp played at a reasonable level (not too quiet or it'll sound thin) will produce a more controlled sound.

the easiest thing though, is to use a solid-state booster, like a tubescreamer to push the amp a little harder. this will allow you to have lots of drive without having to push the amp terribly hard. the end result is that the amp becomes somewhat more controllable while you still get enough gain.



can you please elaborate on the third method? :-) do i exclusively need a tubescreamer?
#14
Quote by Alijonroth
can you please elaborate on the third method? :-) do i exclusively need a tubescreamer?


nope. you essentially use a distortion or overdrive pedal to boost the signal coming out of your guitar. basically, you are using the pedal to augment the distortion produced by your amplifier. its not rocket science. however, by choosing the right distortion unit (I mentioned the tubescreamer because everybody and their grandma uses one), you can alter the sound you get to suit your needs
#15
Quote by Alijonroth
so isnt there a way to get the best of both words? like make the analog distortion sound more controlled?


it will always come down to 2 things - how you have your amp set and technique.

as already mentioned you need less gain than you think to get a good lead sound. a common mistake that newer players make is heaping on the gain (i was just as guilty but the amount of gain available now far exceeds what i was using) thinking that makes it better. if you record you'll be amazed at how little gain you really need. work your eq as well. find the sweet spots that let the notes ring out and sound clear.

the second thing is to learn to play your notes cleanly and be able to articulate them as you want. this takes time and practice. find a pick that works for you and practice playing notes with no distortion. this will show you flaws in picking and force you to work on articulation of your notes.
#17
Quote by krehzeekid
nope. you essentially use a distortion or overdrive pedal to boost the signal coming out of your guitar. basically, you are using the pedal to augment the distortion produced by your amplifier. its not rocket science. however, by choosing the right distortion unit (I mentioned the tubescreamer because everybody and their grandma uses one), you can alter the sound you get to suit your needs


In my opinion, the tubescreamer is way too overpriced, just because it's famous. Something like the Jekyll and Hyde is just as good (even better, I feel), cheaper, and has both od AND distortion.
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#18
Quote by Alijonroth
i agree with you, i sold my digitech multi effects unit and got an analog pedal instead, but last night i jammed with a guy playing a Boss GT-8 and his notes came out clearer, esp at fast licks...while it wasnt easy for me to clear them out, he didnt seem to have a problem, and i remembered i didnt have a problem when i had my digitech

does this mean its easier to shred with multi FX pedals? isnt there a way i could get better clarity out of the analog pedals?

What digitech unit did you have?
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#20
Oh, that's an old one. No wonder why it sounded so bad. The newer ones(rp155,255,355,500,1000) sound a lot better than the old ones.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food