#1
I have for a long time played these chords together with a travis picking sort of style and it sounds nice to my ear. But the thing is that I just can't figure out what key they belong to! I sometimes try to limit myself to keys and make music that way, but it can sometimes be more "colorful" to use your ear and perhaps find other stuff that also sounds nice with just using your ear to guide you.

The chords are F# maj7 followed by a chord that I have no idea what it's called. The tones that are in it are open A in the bass, a G# on the 6th fret on the D string, C# on the 6 fret of the G string, D# on the 4th fret on the B string and finally another G# on the 4th fret on the high E string. That is then followed by a G# major, bar chord in the fourth position.

So basically F#maj7 --> Strange chord --> G# major

The tones I use are A, A#, C, C#, D#, F, F#, G#.

It feels like either the G# or the F# could be the root, but I still don't know what key it is and what scale that would fit to it! I would really appreciate some help And if someone also is able to tell me what chords that are in the key it would be really helpful too!

Thank you!
#2
Hmm I don't really know. I think it's probably called a C#sus2/A or something like that. My advice is don't try and "fit a scale" to it but just sing over the top and try and find what sounds natural
#4
DbM? The two major chords seem like they be the IV-V in the progression?

...or C#M, its enharmonic equivalent.

In any case, those notes are C# augmented fifth scale...
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#5
So, you've got an A, G#, C#, D#, C# in the mystery chord? I'm thinking it's a G#sus4/A. The 4th is suspended from the 5th of the F#maj7 and is properly resolved to the 3rd (B#) of the G# chord. The chromatic bass note (A) creates a pull toward the G# in the final chord. Judging by the suspension and the bass movement, this progression likely resolves to G#. You need to listen to truly determine that, though.

I could also call that chord an Amaj7(b5)--with the D# written as an Eb--but judging by the context, I'd say it's not as likely.

If your key truly is G#, you'd base your playing around the major scale, but since the chords are chromatic, you'd have to use accidentals wisely. Your job is to listen to the progression, determine which chord the progression resolves to. This will be your key (unless it's part of a longer phrase that resolves elsewhere.)
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#6
Hmm, one guy told me that he thought it could be F# Lydian diminished, but when I look at it now it seems more like a C# bebop major scale?
#7
Quote by Azhark
Hmm, one guy told me that he thought it could be F# Lydian diminished, but when I look at it now it seems more like a C# bebop major scale?

Neither of those are keys. As soviet_ska said, if the key is G#, you're using the G# major scale with accidentals.
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#8
Quote by Azhark
Hmm, one guy told me that he thought it could be F# Lydian diminished, but when I look at it now it seems more like a C# bebop major scale?


There's not going to be a magical answer as far as scales go. Your harmony is very chromatic, which I applaud, but the fact is you're going to have to leave the scale to figure out how to work with this one. Try working around your chord tones and then create simple tensions where applicable.
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#9
Just from listening to the chord and not looking at the notes I can assure you the chord is a Amaj7#11.

You won't find one scale that fits all the chords, that is hardly ever the case in music. If i was approaching that progression I would use F# and A lydian scales respectively.
#10
Here's my two cents in a world where the penny is obsolete..

Since A is your bass note, I'm making that the root. So, in the chord we have an A G# C# and a D#. Compare that to Amaj, which is A B C# D E F# G#, we have; Root, Maj3rd, flattened 5th, and a maj7th. So, ultimately, you have an Amaj7(b5). Just like others have said.

But, in context, with the chords that come before and after, different notes may pull to other notes, changing the functions of each note. Like sovietska said. Which is how it actually should be analyzed.
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#11
Thank you very much for your help everyone! I really appreciate it