#1
To what speed do you practice your scales and how long does it take you to learn one scale position (to get to your desired speed)? I know it's not all about speed etc. but I just want to see what you guys are doing and see where I'm at.
Thanks!
#2
Learning scales isn't about speed at all. It's about learning patterns of notes which sound good together.

I think the best way to get these things into your head is to improvise using them. Try making use of the Backing Track Band which is at the top of this forum or some of the backing tracks advertised in my sig (which is admittedly sparse at the moment but I have a bunch of shit cooking which is being slowed down by having to do stuff like work).
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#3
Quote by pasnu
To what speed do you practice your scales and how long does it take you to learn one scale position (to get to your desired speed)? I know it's not all about speed etc. but I just want to see what you guys are doing and see where I'm at.
Thanks!

I don't. Practicing scale shapes and positions on guitar is pretty pointless. Most of the music you're going to encounter will not be composed primarily of scalar runs, one after another. Unless you're playing a lot of baroque-inspired passages or boring, uninspired solos, you're not going encounter a lot of straight scalar runs. Consequently, I don't see any need to practice scales. It doesn't make me a better player.

Quite honestly, if you want to get fast, it's obvious that you want to play some song or another that is fast. Why not, instead of practicing scales over and over, simply start learning the song that you want to play that's so blisteringly fast? That will give you practice and give you a context to which you can actually apply your burgeoning skills rather than a meaningless exercise.

Having tried to practice using scales, I must say that my chops improved significantly after I stopped that and began learning to play songs. Seeing how fast I wanted to play and what I needed to improve upon in order to play the stuff I wanted to play, I have advanced a lot more in the past year than I did in my first two years of playing (and that's including the time that I've put into cleaning up my picking technique).
#4
I don't. It isn't really a productive way to practice.
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#6
its not about speed or the shape, rofl, it's about playing WITHIN that scale. and well i learn 1 position thoughrly before learning another. make sure you know where the root notes are. then jam over a backing track to get used to it

Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
I don't. It isn't really a productive way to practice.

LOLOK
#7
i run through a scale of my choice (which most of the time happens to be harmonic minor) simply to warm my fingers up, i dont practice them otherwise, i also dont create those patterns to follow, i simply know the notes on the fretboard, know of which notes the scale consists and go.

Never played scales to increase speed, just warm up. To increase speed i take metronome and run chromatics for alt. picking and (currently) 5 string A minor and Diminished shapes for sweeping


nevertheless, when i warm up scales go something like this, A harmonic minor/E phrygian dominant (since i begin on E)

e----------------------------------0-1-4-5-4-1
B---------------------------0-1-3--------------5-3-1
G--------------------1-2-4---------------------------5-4-2
D-------------0-2-3----------------------------------------6-3-2
A------0-2-3--------------------------------------------------- 5-3-2
E0-1-4----------------------------------------------------------------5-4-1-4-5-7

etc. just ascend-descend to hit all the notes of said scale on the neck up to 24th fret
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#8
scales are easy, its best not to learn them, but to learn the modes, and their effect on the major(Aeolian) mode, and from there, build scales, and speed them up as fast as you can in a 5-10 minute session, then stop, so you can keep using it as a non muscle memorized practice.
#9
Quote by ninja2142
scales are easy, its best not to learn them, but to learn the modes, and their effect on the major(Aeolian) mode, and from there, build scales, and speed them up as fast as you can in a 5-10 minute session, then stop, so you can keep using it as a non muscle memorized practice.

I would not pay attention to this post.
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#10
Quote by ninja2142
scales are easy, its best not to learn them, but to learn the modes, and their effect on the major(Aeolian) mode, and from there, build scales, and speed them up as fast as you can in a 5-10 minute session, then stop, so you can keep using it as a non muscle memorized practice.


Wow... there is just so much wrong with this post I don't even know where to begin. So I won't.
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#11
Well when learning scales i play each each shape (urgh i hate that word) at a slow tempo (maybe quarter notes at 90bpm?) and think about what intervals and notes it is im playing. Since i know wich intervals i like the sound of.

Think about notes in the scale, not shapes.
#12
I don't well.. practicing songs that I like improves my playing and attaches me more to the guitar..
#13
Quote by ninja2142
scales are easy, its best not to learn them, but to learn the modes, and their effect on the major(Aeolian) mode, and from there, build scales, and speed them up as fast as you can in a 5-10 minute session, then stop, so you can keep using it as a non muscle memorized practice.


Not sure if serious...
Actually called Mark!

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#14
Quote by s31770
its not about speed or the shape, rofl, it's about playing WITHIN that scale. and well i learn 1 position thoughrly before learning another. make sure you know where the root notes are. then jam over a backing track to get used to it


LOLOK

Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#15
I turn off all electronics sit down with the scales in front of my face with a metronome starting slow and gradually getting faster. Use the damn metronome as boring as it may sound it helps.
#16
I go for a 3 note per string shape and use alternate picking. Improves my alternate picking and "scale stuff" at the same time.
#17
Quote by ninja2142
scales are easy, its best not to learn them, but to learn the modes, and their effect on the major(Aeolian) mode, and from there, build scales, and speed them up as fast as you can in a 5-10 minute session, then stop, so you can keep using it as a non muscle memorized practice.


Just wanted to inform you that major aint the aeolian, it´s the Ionian.

Ignore that post.
#18
Quote by ninja2142
scales are easy, its best not to learn them, but to learn the modes, and their effect on the major(Aeolian) mode, and from there, build scales, and speed them up as fast as you can in a 5-10 minute session, then stop, so you can keep using it as a non muscle memorized practice.


Only an idiot would play modes on a guitar since to have proper harmony in the backround you need music that is neither major/minor (all music is major/minor for the last... oh idk 300 years?)

Modes are a waste of time, unless your playing piano or jazz in music school, don't even bother with modes, there's a reason no one has used them much since Greek in some year BC (yep, they are that old and outdated)
#19
Quote by hansome21
Only an idiot would play modes on a guitar since to have proper harmony in the backround you need music that is neither major/minor (all music is major/minor for the last... oh idk 300 years?)


You could play modal music quite easily using hybrid picking/finger picking in a contrapuntal style.
Quote by hansome21

Modes are a waste of time, unless your playing piano or jazz in music school, don't even bother with modes, there's a reason no one has used them much since Greek in some year BC (yep, they are that old and outdated)


They were developed further in the Dark/Middle Ages and they starting falling out of the musical landscape in the Renaissance/Baroque eras. Modes aren't a total waste of time, but they are given way more hype by guitarists than they are truly useful for.
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#20
Quote by ninja2142
scales are easy, its best not to learn them, but to learn the modes, and their effect on the major(Aeolian) mode, and from there, build scales, and speed them up as fast as you can in a 5-10 minute session, then stop, so you can keep using it as a non muscle memorized practice.

Epic troll xD

But TS, i practice my scales while improvising and playing around with it
#21
Quote by ninja2142
scales are easy, its best not to learn them, but to learn the modes, and their effect on the major(Aeolian) mode, and from there, build scales, and speed them up as fast as you can in a 5-10 minute session, then stop, so you can keep using it as a non muscle memorized practice.


Are you that ignorant and daft? You need to reconsider yourself as a guitar player, my good sir. Scales are the building blocks to knowing your fretboard and a crucial aspect in mastering your instrument. To say that it's best not to learn them is from someone with minimal to no existing knowledge on scales. YOU have a lot of learning to do.