#1
Ok you guys are gonna laugh at me but I just got a strat a month ago and haven't got use the whammy bar because A: I don't know how put it in and B: after it's in do I simply pull it towards me or actually exert force and lift up on the bar to make it scream? Sorry guys this my first strat, I baby her and don't try nothing unless I know what I'm doing first. I have a 2008 usa standard, thanks.
#2
A i think strat wammy bars are screwed on you put it in the hole and turn it clockwise to screw it in
B that depends on how its set up
floating(which i doubt) you dont have to put much pressure to pull it up or push it down If its not floating you cant pull it up only down and that could take a little bit more force depending on how its set up
Last edited by supersac at Jul 12, 2011,
#3
it just screws in. insert threaded end of bar into the hole in the bridge and screw. the only way you'll be able to "pull" it towards you is if its a floating bridge. odds are it isnt, not too many strats have floating bridges. you press the bar down or in toward the body of the guitar for dive bombs.
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#4
It should just screw in

Standard strat trems are not floating, so you will not be able to pull up on it, they only dive. If you want to make it "scream", i suggest diving it, then hitting a harmonic, and bringing it back up to pitch. Ive also seen it where people loosen the claw's screws in the back to let you pull up on it, but thats not to great for your instrument, as the tension in the springs is now less, it would take a whole new setup, etc.
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#5
Quote by headfest88
it just screws in. insert threaded end of bar into the hole in the bridge and screw. the only way you'll be able to "pull" it towards you is if its a floating bridge. odds are it isnt, not too many strats have floating bridges. you press the bar down or in toward the body of the guitar for dive bombs.

Don't think it's a floating, it's just a standard bridge I can put pics on if I need to, and oh ok I haven't tried putting pressure on it, and how many times do I turn it? I turned it about 6 times and it wouldn't go any more?
#6
Yes, I am laughing, but we all start somewhere. All you have to do is put it in the empty hole on the bridge (thats what she said), and screw it in. Ya know, lefty loosey righty tighty. To use it you just push it towards the body of the guitar and it should go down in sound level. Do not pull up on it. Do not dive bomb it, means dont push as far as you can, with newer strings. It will go out of tune. When you get new strings, Pull on them tightly as you wind them up. And then use the whammy bar often and re-tune the guitar every other minute. It will make it so as the strings get used more, you can use the whammy bar for fast vibrato and dive-bombing without going out of tune. Considering the fact that I now have a les paul, I don't have a whammy but I do know how it works. So i hope this answers your ?'s
#7
a floating bridge will look very very strange, if it looks normal its not floating.

And if the bridge is set up right you can pull up to tighten the strings to make it scream(not that much, but you can) and push down for a nice little dive.
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#8
Realistically if you wanna make it "scream" you need a full-floating tremolo like on most Ibanez/Dean/Jackson guitars, this is because to really get that high-pitched scream you need to LIFT the bar which I don't think Strats are designed for. You can still do similar sounds like someone mentioned above, but not to the same radical degree
#9
Ah I love you guys so much.. no homo this rocks I just tried it, sounds epic thanks so muc hfor putting up with my newby self haha
#10
You do not want to push it away from you. Always palm towards you gently and release and repeat. Once you get used to it you can push and pull real hard for the Hendrix " dive-bombs" effects. Because it is your first time just do as I said in the second sentence.
#11
Quote by Cdfairburn
You do not want to push it away from you. Always palm towards you gently and release and repeat. Once you get used to it you can push and pull real hard for the Hendrix " dive-bombs" effects. Because it is your first time just do as I said in the second sentence.

Thanks brah and trust me I was slow as heck the first time, and then the second I went down super far and crapped myself due to nervousness lmao
#12
Quote by rocknroll radio
a floating bridge will look very very strange, if it looks normal its not floating.


A floating bridge on a strat would look very weird, considering this is what a floating bridge looks like:
(Invalid img)

Besides that, there is a disproportionate amount of misinformation in this thread.
A normal Strat bridge can be set up to be floating (i.e. meaning you can "pull up" on it and raise the pitch of a note with the tremolo). A Floating Tremolo does not mean Floyd-Rose guys, that's a Locking Tremolo. In fact, Strat tremolos were originally designed to be floating.

A Strat that's been set up to be floating would look like this:

(This is actually an extreme example, most of the time a floating trem would never be this high off the body.)

Notice how the bridge/tremolo is raised off the body? and how you can see the Tremolo Block that's underneath? That means it's floating, and it's raised so you can get the extra room to bend up.

If you can fit like a credit card or a something of similar thickness underneath the back of you bridge, that means it's been set up to be floating. And honestly, if you don't know your bridge is floating, then it probably isn't.
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Last edited by kangaxxter at Jul 13, 2011,
#13
A floating bridge on a strat would look very weird, considering this is what a floating bridge looks like:
(Invalid img)

Besides that, there is a disproportionate amount of misinformation in this thread.
A normal Strat bridge can be set up to be floating (i.e. meaning you can "pull up" on it and raise the pitch of a note with the tremolo). A Floating Tremolo does not mean Floyd-Rose guys, that's a Locking Tremolo. In fact, Strat tremolos were originally designed to be floating.

A Strat that's been set up to be floating would look like this:

(This is actually an extreme example, most of the time a floating trem would never be this high off the body.)

beat me to it. i have my strats set to float and they work fine as well as stay in tune. a good setup and some common sense will keep a fender trem in tune. you can do dive bombs (van halen 's frst 3 albums were done with a fender style trem) and other whammy tricks as long as you remember that a fender trem isn't made to drop as far as a floyd rose. you won't get as much flutter either. a properly cut nut will allow the strings to move through it without binding (to much). a big plus to having te bridge set to float is tha you can often just give it a quick yank up and the stings will unkink at the nut. with some time and practice a fender style trem can yield some cool sounds and stay in tune reasonably well. check out any recent jeff beck video to see what amazing stuff can be done with a non locking trem.