#2
To go pro or mess around?
I'm so happy. I get to eat a muffin.
Quote by space aids
You are so happy to eat a muffin it's kinda scary.
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Goes around tryina light dudes on fire.
Quote by MakinLattes
Too much Sublime.

I tell a lie, there is no such thing.
#3
That really depends on what you want to do in the band...

Ideally you want to be good enough that you can have a glance over a tab and pretty much be able to play along with a song (assuming it's not overly complex), and able to improvise your way through passages that you forget in the moment.

Really, that question doesn't have an answer, it depends on who you play with, and where you/they want to take it. I'd say if you can play/jam with your friends that would best.

Although what I would say about it is that joining a band is pretty the fastest way to get better, especially if you guys you're playing with are good (and patient).
#5
Quote by Wolffgang
That really depends on what you want to do in the band...

Ideally you want to be good enough that you can have a glance over a tab and pretty much be able to play along with a song (assuming it's not overly complex), and able to improvise your way through passages that you forget in the moment.

Really, that question doesn't have an answer, it depends on who you play with, and where you/they want to take it. I'd say if you can play/jam with your friends that would best.

Although what I would say about it is that joining a band is pretty the fastest way to get better, especially if you guys you're playing with are good (and patient).

+1 This pretty much sums it up. Totally depends on what the band expects from its members and its goals.
#6
Quote by Trent Armitage
So I should be ok with like a year and a half experience?

It's hard to determine skill on the time you've played it's really how much you've practiced. If you can site read and improve, then yeah, go for it.
I'm so happy. I get to eat a muffin.
Quote by space aids
You are so happy to eat a muffin it's kinda scary.
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Goes around tryina light dudes on fire.
Quote by MakinLattes
Too much Sublime.

I tell a lie, there is no such thing.
#7
I can just look at a tab and play along as long as it doesn't jump too much around the fretboard like crazy fast, but I can play lets say Supermassive Black Hole just by looking at tab and not at the guitar
#8
Then I think you'd be fine.

Get out there and give it a go. You may knocked back a couple of times, but every time that happened to me, I found the band I was auditioning for were pretty helpful as to why they thought I wasn't right for them, so it meant I had a direction to try and improve in thereafter.
#9
Look at Sid Vicious, it's not always about skill :p

That being said, I've never auditioned for a band, but practiced with friends, and made go no where jam bands with them, and that's where the best experience comes from, you really learn "who you are" when you jam with people, playing alone for a long time can give you bad habits, such as playing to loud or obtrusively, poor timing or even too precise timing, and bad EQ habits. As a bassist, find a real live drummer and stick with him for life.
#10
You don't have to have any particular level of skill or experience to join a band. If a band will take you (and provided you get along with them and all that) then go for it. Even if the other members are significantly more experienced/practiced, there's no better learning experience then playing with people who are better then you.
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#11
Quote by askrere
Look at Sid Vicious, it's not always about skill :p

Yeah, if you've got someone to record your parts for you and you just mime your parts live. Dude couldn't and didn't play a thing.
Basses:
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#12
It's really not so much about being able to jam and improvise man. There's much more to music than that. For instance I read an article on UG about Slayer's bass or drum player leaving the band because the band wasn't able to improvise. They could only play music if it was tabbed out. Don't get me wrong it's awesome to be able to improvise and it takes you to a whole different universe w/ emotion because it's YOUR music! But in my opinion you can join a band when you understand the fundamentals of music and are familiar with your instrument. Once you have a setlist you can learn those songs and play them strongly enough to go rock out a show. Sit down with the songs listen to the timing, cues, note changes, etc. Get so familiar with it that when you hear it you know exactly what's going on in the song. Playing by yourself or with a band you want to be a "tight" player. Play with emotion!
#13
That's a tough question to answer, man. If you need to ask it, perhaps you shouldn't be joining a band? You need confidence to play with other musicians, it is as vastly important as your actual technical skills. If you have that confidence, then go for it. Even if you're a terrible bassist, the experience you gain from playing with other musicians is invaluable. You'll learn the bass's role within an ensemble, you'll learn how to jam and improvise, you'll learn how to write and structure your basslines and what kind of bassline works with what chords, riffs, etc. These are things which theory can help you understand, but which only practice can ingrain in your mind and instincts.
#15
Beyond being able to simply memorize enough music for a set, and having the ears to listen to your bandmates, it's all about how tight you are for bass players. If you have dead on timing and a great sense of feel, but only play roots, you're ready to be in a decent band. If you have mad shredding skills, but still don't intuitively understand where the implied accents or swing notes go, or how to lock down in the pocket, I'd say you need to jam with a rhythm section quite a bit more before you join a gigging band.

Of course it's best when you really know how to move those fingers and shake things up and have an awesome sense of timing.
#16
Well, I joined my current band when I had only like 4 months of bass experience Then again I'm a pretty fast learner haha, but yeah - a band can really help you progress imo. You should have at least the basics down though.
Professional lurker since 2009.
#17
Quote by consecutive e
Yeah, if you've got someone to record your parts for you and you just mime your parts live. Dude couldn't and didn't play a thing.


I know, hence the tongue of jest
#18
You don't have to be amazing to be in a band. Me and my friends jam together all the time, just know how to improvise a little and you'll be fine. I find when I improv with people, we don't shred insanely fast, it's more melodic and slower. Not that much technique involved, but it's the mental aspect of knowing what sounds good.

Best advice Ii can give is to just go with it, listen to what everyone else is playing, don't play as much as possible.