#1
I can string skip fairly well, but when I put on a jam track and try to apply it in a solo for some reason it just doesn't sound right to me. Are there certain notes to skip to or do I just keep noodling around until I find something good? Any advice on keeping the flow with string skipping?
#2
well they are just notes and when string skiiping you usually have biggerintervals

i have the feeling you dont know muc theory(you might im sorry if i offended you) but if you know what notes sound "good"string skipping shouldnt be much of a problem
so yeah maybe learn a bit of theory and just play around till something sounds good
#3
Usually string-skipping is affiliated with shreddy/neoclassical music, and it's pretty damn hard to improvise it. I'd suggest writing out the fills ahead of time rather than trying to just shit diamonds with it. It takes a lot to make a string-skipping run sound good on, say, a bluesy/funky background, and trying to do it off the top of your head just isn't the best idea. For note choices...it just depends on what you're trying to do. Basic major/minor intervals should suffice unless you're trying to be like Jeff Loomis or something.
modes are a social construct
#4
String skipping is just another technique to play notes. Learn what notes sound good in different songs and you should be able to figure it out from there.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
Try applying them with some of your appegiated chords, Keep the string skipping small just skip one maybe 2 strings.

STring skipping really helps to add a different sound to your work. Its just hard to apply it similar to sweep picking. So while your jaming get into it and try to listen for the sound your after.
#6
thanks for the help. and supersac it's cool, i know a bit of theory but intervals i havent studied that much because it just seemed overwhelming at the time memorizing all those shapes
#7
Quote by zosomagic
thanks for the help. and supersac it's cool, i know a bit of theory but intervals i havent studied that much because it just seemed overwhelming at the time memorizing all those shapes

That's why you shouldn't memorize scales, rather learn the notes and intervals that make up a scale. And I'm pretty sure just about everyone uses some string skipping without even thinking about it. Otherwise you'd essentially be playing a scale up and down. Just be careful not to have TOO big of intervals all the time or it seems to lose context
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#8
Don't think with your fingers. In other words, play what you want to hear. If you just decide to play string-skipping stuff without any target in mind, it will probably just sound bad.

However, string-skipping can be useful in improvising if you have planned it beforehand. Most string-skipping sections I've seen utilize quartal chords (I'm not sure if that's the word in English) meaning chords with 4 tones. dim7 and m7 arpeggios are really common for string-skipping. You're going to have to stretch quite a bit though.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#9
string skipping (and any other technique) is a way to play something, not what you play. if you try to skip strings for the sake of it, it'l be contrived, if theres a passage that neccesitates string skipping, then go for it--but theres no sense in playing a line written for the sake of skipping strings.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#10
Quote by QuantumMechanix
That's why you shouldn't memorize scales, rather learn the notes and intervals that make up a scale.

i would like to know what you think "memorizing scales" is then. because im pretty sure learning the notes and intervals would be memorizing the scale. if you mean dont learn the scale shapes, then i say no to this because there is no reason to suggest this. scales and patterns are very useful and anyone who says they dont use them is either lying or misinformed. there is no reason why you cant do both anyway. in fact it would be a lot easier to do that.
#11
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
i would like to know what you think "memorizing scales" is then. because im pretty sure learning the notes and intervals would be memorizing the scale. if you mean dont learn the scale shapes, then i say no to this because there is no reason to suggest this. scales and patterns are very useful and anyone who says they dont use them is either lying or misinformed. there is no reason why you cant do both anyway. in fact it would be a lot easier to do that.

I did mean to say "scale shapes". IMO you'll naturally get used to the shapes once you get familiar with the scale up and down the entire fretboard. Then you start to connect all the shapes and you'll be able to actually apply the notes in a scale rather than just confining yourself to a box shape
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#12
Skips (melodic intervals of a third or greater) are often followed by contrary motion, either stepwise or by skip. This helps even out some of the empty space left by the big interval you just played. For example, you play Bb - G--a major 6th. Try Bb - G - F or Bb - G - Eb and compare to Bb - G - A or Bb - G - C.

EDIT: In case I wasn't clear, the first pair of ideas is a major sixth upwards then down to the final note. The second pair is major sixth up, then continuing up to the last note.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
Last edited by soviet_ska at Jul 13, 2011,
#14
Quote by QuantumMechanix
I did mean to say "scale shapes". IMO you'll naturally get used to the shapes once you get familiar with the scale up and down the entire fretboard. Then you start to connect all the shapes and you'll be able to actually apply the notes in a scale rather than just confining yourself to a box shape

i suppose. nothing wrong with shapes though. they let you span a two octave range with minimal movement.
#15
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
i suppose. nothing wrong with shapes though. they let you span a two octave range with minimal movement.

Well, the problem comes with people that say "I know the major scale shape! What do I do with it?". Whereas if they had learned the notes they'd see the notes of C Major or whatever all over the fretboard, and hopefully already be applying them.

That's how I did it, and now I use shapes a lot. It "evolved" into shapes, if you will. They're easy, fast and require minimal amounts of work, but I know what I'm doing when I do it. It's just how you learn I guess
#16
What's wrong with shapes?

I think people forget how they themselves developed.

The answers that others give...is correct, what's wrong with these answers is that most didn't learn the way they now postulate as better, until wayyyyy later in their devlopment.

So, how do you think you got there in the first place?

It's transitions...its milestones...its maturity...development and understanding that comes from exploring these approaches, and THEN outgrowing them, and reaching further.

You dont start out by reaching further... and I'll be so bold as to say that pushing someone further along and eschewing the basics and benefits of shapes, patterns and scales is pure ignorance in most cases.

Best,

Sean
#17
^Agrees... shapes are brilliant learning aids... we all use em... we all started on em...

+1