#1
Okay, here we have Ab Dim 7th: Ab, Cb, Ebb, Gbb
Why would It be written with the double flats instead of just writing it Ab, Cb, D, F?
I don't really understand it.
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#2
It's really the same issue as G# versus Ab. Context dictates the nomenclature. If it's a progression in E major, you'd say G# instead of Ab. Obviously this is a simplified example, but that's the easiest way to explain it.

You can really call the notes whatever you want, but the double flats help tell the context of the chord. If you see it written Ab, Cb, D and F, without knowing what the chord is, it can be pretty baffling trying to figure out that it's just a dim7. They take the regular notes and add the diminished aspect for everyone's convenience.
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#3
because your flattening the notes of the Ab scale to make them diminished
intervals for a diminished chord
are root,minor third,diminished fifth,diminished 7

notes of AB scale
Ab Bb C Db Eb F G Ab

so the notes your using are
Ab root
C major third
Eb perfect fifth
G major 7th
we have to make these so that they are the correct intervals

AB root
C major third we have to flatten it to make it a minro third Cb
Eb perfect fifth we have to flatten that to make it a tritone Ebb
G major 7th we have to flatten it twice to make it diminished(Gb would be a minor 7th) Gbb

in the key of Ab
D it wouldne be a diminished fifht but an augmented 4th
and F isnt a diminished 7th but a major 6th

its mostly for naming sake but i explained it as well as i could
i hope youunder stand my ramblings
Last edited by supersac at Jul 13, 2011,
#4
Quote by Hail
It's really the same issue as G# versus Ab. Context dictates the nomenclature. If it's a progression in E major, you'd say G# instead of Ab. Obviously this is a simplified example, but that's the easiest way to explain it.

You can really call the notes whatever you want, but the double flats help tell the context of the chord. If you see it written Ab, Cb, D and F, without knowing what the chord is, it can be pretty baffling trying to figure out that it's just a dim7. They take the regular notes and add the diminished aspect for everyone's convenience.


I think I get what you're saying. Hopefully this will make sense.

The reason it's written Ab, Cb, Ebb, Gbb is because when reading it when you're reading the double flat parts(Ebb, Gbb in this case) you can tell that they are saying the the 5th and 7th diminished by adding the double flat instead of just plane D and F so it just faster to read and understand?

Does that make sense? Because I can't figure out how to word it for the life of me, haha.
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#5
Quote by unicornfist
I think I get what you're saying. Hopefully this will make sense.

The reason it's written Ab, Cb, Ebb, Gbb is because when reading it when you're reading the double flat parts(Ebb, Gbb in this case) you can tell that they are saying the the 5th and 7th diminished by adding the double flat instead of just plane D and F so it just faster to read and understand?

Does that make sense? Because I can't figure out how to word it for the life of me, haha.


Pretty much. Like the sir above said, an F is a maj6th here rather than a diminished 7th, and there's a big difference. They're the same tone, but the context is much different.

An easier way to look at it is to just eliminate the flats for the sake of example. Say it's Adim7, it'd just be A, C, Eb, Gb. This is the exact same thing, but with everything 1 tone lower.
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#7
The notes on the stave have their own lines... and renaming a note to F instead of Gbb changes it to a 6th instead and changes the line its written on. So in order for it to remain seen as a 7th (or a bb7) it has to occupy its own line. Same goes for the 5th and all the others. Make sense?
#8
Quote by unicornfist
Okay, here we have Ab Dim 7th: Ab, Cb, Ebb, Gbb
Why would It be written with the double flats instead of just writing it Ab, Cb, D, F?
I don't really understand it.


Well if you had Ab, Cb, D and F, that would be a D*7/Ab, now wouldn't it? Likewise, if you wrote that Cb as a B, you would have Ab, B, D and F: a B*7/Ab. Hell, if you wrote the Ab as a G#, you'd get G#, B, D and F: a G#*7. See how this works?
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#9
Alright I believe I understand it now. Thanks all that helped.
Current Gear:
Mexican Fender Telecaster
Robert Smith custom Jazzmaster
Stratocaster
Vox AC4TV