#1
Being half Filipino myself, my family finally got around to telling me the Philippines developed a badass martial art just like those Chinese/Japanese/Korean styles we always see and hear about. Basic Background: Filipino martial arts are a self-defense practice that use weapons primarily, such as fighting sticks or knives, but can also employ the use of pretty much anything as a weapon, like a ballpoint pen for example. Now, my question to you pit monkies, is have any of you ever had any experience with Filipino martial arts? Also, I'm planning on getting training at an academy in my city for the 2 months before I'm off to college. What progress am I to ideally expect? (oh and it's a legit academy, even called something like Philippine Martial Arts Academy etc. etc.)

Or just talk about other martial arts experiences if you want.
Haikus are easy
But sometimes they don't make sense
Refrigerator

Quote by ZanasCross
1st grade up through 5th grade, the cool kids always sat in the back of the bus, so I never understood why Black people were so upset, I thought we were telling them they were cool.
Last edited by Wibanez at Jul 13, 2011,
#2
Yup, i've had various lessons in escrima and filipino stick-fighting, although it's been years since i've practiced either. Still remember some of the moves and training exercises though. It's pretty fun to learn to defend yourself with a sword in one hand and a knife in the other!
#3
how far can i get in 2 months? can i learn all the basics in that time?
Haikus are easy
But sometimes they don't make sense
Refrigerator

Quote by ZanasCross
1st grade up through 5th grade, the cool kids always sat in the back of the bus, so I never understood why Black people were so upset, I thought we were telling them they were cool.
#5
Sounds like it would be a great experience! Make sure to get a little trial before throwing in payments though. I just came here to say PACMAN!!!
.
#6
Quote by Wibanez
how far can i get in 2 months? can i learn all the basics in that time?


Couldn't say. Every teacher/dojo/class is different. Even for the basics, you're going to need a lot of practice to apply any of it to real life situations. If you have someone at home to practice with, it helps a lot.
#7
I study Kung-Fu, Hung Ga (has a bunch of different spellings) to be specific but my sifu has also studied Arnis de Mano and is incredibly proficient at it.
I don't take the class so I really don't know too much about it but the class is right before my kung-fu class and I've seen some incredibly brutal attacks with the sticks as well as deadly skill with butterfly knives. My sifu's students were using butterfly knives that had rounded out blade edges so as not to slice their hands up but my sifu was using the real deal and was doing it with one in each hand. Pretty intense.
I don't know which martial arts would be best for you but from what my sifu has told me, he likes Arnis de Mano because the training gives you the ability to turn almost any hand-held object into a deadly weapon. Anything from a tree branch to a rolled up magazine.
Gibson LP Studio
Taylor 518E
Washburn WD15SCE acoustic electric
Carvin DC727 (ordered! The wait is driving me nuts!)
#8
Studied Eskrima for around a month or two. Learned all the basics like sustained striking, basic defense positions and stuff like that. From what I found, it's a lot more practical than some of the other martial arts I've done (Karate, Capoeira), so you can probably expect to learn some good stuff quickly. Also probably expect bruised arms when beginning, if my experience has taught me anything.

EDIT: I study krav maga now, and for comparison with that, I lean towards krav maga actually.
Last edited by denfilade at Jul 13, 2011,
#9
do martial arts studios/academies/dojos allow trial lessons usually?
Haikus are easy
But sometimes they don't make sense
Refrigerator

Quote by ZanasCross
1st grade up through 5th grade, the cool kids always sat in the back of the bus, so I never understood why Black people were so upset, I thought we were telling them they were cool.
#10
Quote by Wibanez
do martial arts studios/academies/dojos allow trial lessons usually?



Yes, in my experience it's unusual if they don't.

And it's the same as guitar, you get out as much as you put in to it.
Funny words.