#1
I know there has to be one of you out there with an answer to this.

I've noticed that on certain guitars it's much easier to do string bends than on others. More specifically, I've noticed that I find it easier to do huge bends on Fender Stratocaster type necks as opposed to those wide and flat jackson/esp type shredder necks, and I've also noticed that action has nothing to do with it because I've done huge bends on strat necks with high action and then had a hard time doing them on a jackson neck with super low action.

Why could this be? Mess with the truss rod? is it the Neck Radius? does anybody know???!
Last edited by xfatalherox at Jul 13, 2011,
#3
The biggest factors in feel/tension are the string gauge and scale length, but there are a lot of things that will have small influences on it too.
#4
I've also read somewhere that raising the action will allow for bigger bends than having super low action. is this true?
#5
Quote by Lord_Doku
1) Scale length.
2) String gauges.
3) Your tuning.

That's it really.

you forgot some
4) action
5) neck radius

higher action for bigger bends. especially on small radius necks.
"When losers say it's over with you know that it's a lie
The gods made heavy metal and it's never gonna die"
#6
That depends on the fretboard radius. Guitars with rounder radii will fret out with bigger bends. Flatter radii let you have lower action and still be able to do bigger bends, because the fretboard itself is flatter.

Quote by kolonelkadat
you forgot some
4) action
5) neck radius

higher action for bigger bends. especially on small radius necks.

They'll affect how much you can bend, but they won't affect the tension of the strings.
Last edited by littlephil at Jul 13, 2011,
#7
Might want to take to watching some video of David Gilmour.
He mostly uses his middle or ring finger to do large bends and holds
down or mutes the strings above the string being bent with the index
finger.

Finger strength is incredibly important. Put your first three finger
tips against the edge of a table with your fingers bent and try to push
outward with your fingers while pushing in slightly with your arm. Also do
the reverse and put your finger tips on the table leg and pull your
fingers toward your palm while pulling out with your arm. Remember to keep your wrist bent in the same manner it would be if playing.

The surface polish of your frets is also important. A rough or warn fret will be
harder to bend on than a nicely polished one. Old oxidized strings can also
make bending harder. Install new strings.
Last edited by sparkeyjames at Jul 13, 2011,
#8
Quote by littlephil

They'll affect how much you can bend, but they won't affect the tension of the strings.

I honestly dont think it was ever a question of string tension. It was simply a question of one guitar being easier than another. while string tension is a part of that difference, it certainly isnt all of it.

and the higher action doesnt just stop you fretting out. It also helps stop the string slipping under your finger so you can get a nice solid push on it.
"When losers say it's over with you know that it's a lie
The gods made heavy metal and it's never gonna die"
#9
String tension has a far bigger impact on the bendability of strings than action and radius do.
And you could just as easily say that low action helps you bend easier because you don't have to push the string as far.
#10
It also has to do with trems. When you bend a note on a strat, the string is longer. The string's usable length is from the bridge to the tuner. When you bend, the entire length is affected. If you bend on a guitar with a Floyd Rose, the string is shorter because the usable length is from the bridge to the nut. There is less string to move. Bending on a Floyd Rose guitar requires a smaller bend than on a strat to get the same pitch. Changes in string length (bending, vibrato, whammy bar shenanigans) affect a Floyd more than a guitar without a locking nut because usable string length is shorter. It's a matter of perception. It feels like you can't bend as much on a guitar with a locking nut but it just feels different.

Edit: When you bend on a guitar with a Floyd. The bridge will move close to the neck. That also makes it feel more difficult to bend. You have to use more force because you have to overcome the change in the bridge. That will affect things more than short string length. That's one of the main things that makes bending more difficult. I forgot to mention this because I use an Edge Zero. Pretty much, it has to do with the bridge and string length. That can be affected by the scale length and headstock shape.
Last edited by JELIFISH19 at Jul 13, 2011,