#1
so i am thinking of down tuning to drop c with my les paul, and i was wondering what string gauge of D'addario's i should using, taking into consideration the les paul has a 24 3/4 inch scale length? 10's? 11's? 12's? and if i do need to go up to twelves from the 10's i have on at te moment would this require me to change anything such as action?
#2
11's should do it. And yeah you should check the action and intonation with that change.
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#3
I would use 12-56's if I used drop C only. However, I like to use D standard, that's why I would get 12-54's. Depending on what tuning you currently use for 10's you might need to adjust your truss rod a bit and see that the strings place well and that the nut does not cause any trouble.
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#4
12-60 set should be ok. as to whether you will have to set action/intonation with the new set, it really depends on how you have it set now, and how you like it.
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#5
Really, 12-60? That's crazy, 11's should be fine, people don't realize that the B string on a 7 string is usually a 56 or higher, like the low E is on an acoustic, and you know how stiff that is.
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#6
First off, a 7 string typically has a ~27" scale length. that means smaller strings get more tension and at the same time can produce a lower note. a 24.25 scale length needs bigger strings to compensate for the shorter scale.

secondarily, I just strung up with 14-68 because 13-60 were too floppy for in E standard. Dont talk to me about crazy.
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#7
14-68 in E standard sounds like overkill.
You probably have more finger strength than most which is why they were too floppy.
But this is a general rule of thumb. I've tried 11s in D standard and it was fine.
The bottom strings can be thicker because they sound better usually, but the top strings, talking 13 and 14 would pretty much hurt to try to bend a full step.
Cusp of Magic
#8
I have an epiphone les paul I would use the 11s-52 they work awesome just get one that has a heavy core they work better. The other guy is right 12-60 is ridiculous. You may have to ajust the truss and the bridge other wise the strings might give you some fret buzz.
#10
Quote by Briyan_15
I have an epiphone les paul I would use the 11s-52 they work awesome just get one that has a heavy core they work better. The other guy is right 12-60 is ridiculous. You may have to ajust the truss and the bridge other wise the strings might give you some fret buzz.

12-60 would be reasonably equal to 10/11-54/56 on a 25.5" scale, I hope you understand...

And with a 24.75" scale length I would use 12-56.

On my 25.5" guitars I use 12-56 for drop C.. So if I had a short scale guitar I'd probably opt for 14 gauge as said above. But that's just me, I like my strings very tight. My attack is pretty hard so if I use little strings they go out of tune rather quickly..
#11
11s should be all you need...I have 10's on my Gibson (with a 24 3/4" scale) and I can get it into drop C fine, but I like a little less tension than some do. My friend uses 11's for drop B and it sounds fine.
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#12
i use .09's for drop C on my Sg :p
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Last edited by m1j3 at Jul 13, 2011,
#14
I think 11s are perfect, depending on the scale length. How tense do you want your strings?
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#16
I use 11-49s on my Epi LP Standard in Drop C and D standard. These strings work perfectly for both of those tunings. You'll need to adjust the intonation, obviously, but other than that you're good to go.

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#17
I honestly use 11-52 on my LTD Eclipse to go to drop C. They work fine
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#18
I use .10's for all my dropped tuning's. I love thinner string's over bigger one's but that just my choice.
#19
i use 11-54 for drop C/D standard on a 24.75" scale.

everything is fine, the 54 could maybe be like a 58 if it was only drop C but again, i also use Dstandasrd alot too
#20
im currently in drop d with 10-46 d'addarios and i like the slightly loose feel of the low d :P, so 11's it is then, i shall put them on and adjust the bridge if nescessary
#21
another question, will my lp studios pickups get a decent bass output when in drop c?
#22
Quote by Jax28
another question, will my lp studios pickups get a decent bass output when in drop c?


In my experience, not much less than in standard tuning. But in my experience the Epiphone stock pickups don't get much bass response in ANY tuning...
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#23
Quote by Jax28
another question, will my lp studios pickups get a decent bass output when in drop c?


If the strings are tight enough, the bass should sound fine. It might be more your amp than the pickups. I mean... It might sound kind of muddy, but that's just Epiphone stock pickups.
#24
I have to run 13-62 Baritone strings (exl158's) on my Epi Les paul (24.75") to get enough tension for drop C. I think it has a weak neck.
#25
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
If the strings are tight enough, the bass should sound fine. It might be more your amp than the pickups. I mean... It might sound kind of muddy, but that's just Epiphone stock pickups.


Epiphone pickups or not, you're mostly going to hear mud.

Several reasons: The scale's pretty short for those tunings, and you don't get distinct separation of note values, no matter what the thickness of the strings. Longer scales generally do better in that regard. Think of the distinction between low notes on a spinet (short scale length) piano compared to that on a 9' Grand.

Another reason is that most, if not all, guitar amps can't reproduce the fundamental tones you're working with. Hell, most amps can't reproduce a low E in standard tuning (82Hz) -- they roll off almost everything below 100Hz. What you actually hear are the harmonics of that note. A C is around 65Hz, and there's no way that reproduces accurately.

And a third reason is that most of the amps being used for this stuff don't have enough power to reproduce those notes with any authority, even if the speakers were up to the task. The lower you go, the more power you need to move that air sufficiently, and a 100W amp won't even come close at any volume at all.

There are solutions. For example, ISP Technologies makes the Vector SL, a separate big ported cabinet with a 15" subwoofer, a 600W internal amp and a set of complicated electronics that peels off the low end from your 100W tube amp's speaker output. That will reproduce a 7-string accurately and cleanly, but even there the scales on the guitars are usually 25.5", 27" and even 30".