#2
B C# D# E F# G# A# B is B major. All of the chords fit except F# minor and A major. I don't know if it feels resolved on B major, but if it does my guess would be B major with borrowed chords (F# minor, A major, both from B minor).
#3
Hey Flex, more key trouble?

Remember, you've got to listen to figure it out for true.

My best guess would be C#m. You've got C#m7 - G#m - F#m - C#m - Amaj9. In C#m, this would be i - v - iv - i - VI. There's an imperfect cadence going from F#m - C#m. The Amaj9 has A C# E G# B, right? Just take away the bass note and you can see the C#m7 that starts the progression over. It's more interesting than ending and starting on the same chord, right?

As for ending the song on the B: B in the key of C#m would be bVII, a dominant chord in minor tonalities. Songs often end on the dominant chord for a more tense ending (though not nearly as often as ending on the tonic.)

This makes the most sense to me, but really give it a listen for the resolution. Hope this gives you a little insight.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#4
Quote by soviet_ska
Hey Flex, more key trouble?

Remember, you've got to listen to figure it out for true.

My best guess would be C#m. You've got C#m7 - G#m - F#m - C#m - Amaj9. In C#m, this would be i - v - iv - i - VI. There's an imperfect cadence going from F#m - C#m. The Amaj9 has A C# E G# B, right? Just take away the bass note and you can see the C#m7 that starts the progression over. It's more interesting than ending and starting on the same chord, right?

As for ending the song on the B: B in the key of C#m would be bVII, a dominant chord in minor tonalities. Songs often end on the dominant chord for a more tense ending (though not nearly as often as ending on the tonic.)

This makes the most sense to me, but really give it a listen for the resolution. Hope this gives you a little insight.


I hadn't forgot our past chats no doubt but I didn't even think of looking into C#m. I've just been messing around with the Major chords. I do remember the resolve and funny because I keep it on my mind with EVERY song I hear.

Could you explain the impefect Cadence? I'm not understanding that part.
#5
Quote by FlexEXP
Could you explain the impefect Cadence? I'm not understanding that part.


Sure. I used the wrong term, by the way. It should be called a plagal cadence. A plagal cadence is a IV - I or iv - i. These are both predominant chords in their respective tonalites resolving to their tonic. While you know the strongest cadence is moving from a dominant (like V, vii* or bVII) to the tonic, a plagal cadence still establishes a tonality, but does it more weakly than a dominant - tonic cadence. I can't think of how to describe it any better, so maybe a quick analysis?

Your C# minor scale:

C# D# E F# G# A B

The A likes to move into the G# and the D# and F# like to move to the E.

A typical V - i cadence (derived from harmonic minor, which adds the B# -> C# leading tone) looks like this:

G# - G#
D# - E
B# - C#
G# - C#


Notice the tension that is created from the B# and D# in the V chord. They both want to move into the tonic triad, and are properly resolved with the arrival of i.

Now a iv - i:

F# - E
C# - C#
A  - G#
F# - C#


See that there are, once again, two tensions that want to move into the tonic triad: the F# and the A. However, these notes resolve to E and G#, the b3 and 5, respectively. There's no note that resolves to the C#, the most important note for establishing tonality; it's already present in both chords, so there isn't quite as strong as a tension between iv and i as there is between V and i, even though both iv and V have two strong tensions.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.