#1
I really would like to learn all of the modes and start tackling scales to improve my playing but it just seems like such a hassle to look something up on the internet and print it out every time. I want to put together a folder with a lot of theory based diagrams so when I feel inclined to learn something it's easier to pick up. What should I put in this folder? Where do I find the materials? Help please!
#2
take a step back.

tell me the notes in Ab major.

if you don't know, stay away from modes. you're only going to harm yourself. start with more fundamental theory, like intervals and chords.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#3
Quote by AeolianWolf
take a step back.

tell me the notes in Ab major.

if you don't know, stay away from modes. you're only going to harm yourself. start with more fundamental theory, like intervals and chords.



Well that's... discouraging. I want shapes to play.
#4
Quote by AeolianWolf
take a step back.

tell me the notes in Ab major.

if you don't know, stay away from modes. you're only going to harm yourself. start with more fundamental theory, like intervals and chords.

No, it sounds like he's looking more for guitar than classical piano don't stifle him with piano crap, there are plenty of books on jazz scales out there or you could try this site it has numerous scales and a chord calculator for harmonic chords http://jguitar.com/ it works great and has everything well organized, as for intervals even in classical training they come after scales as in order to form an interval/chord you need a scale, learn basic scales and then how to harmonize a basic scale, if you understand that then modes and thier harmonization come easy
#6
Quote by Bad Kharmel
No, it sounds like he's looking more for guitar than classical piano don't stifle him with piano crap, there are plenty of books on jazz scales out there or you could try this site it has numerous scales and a chord calculator for harmonic chords http://jguitar.com/ it works great and has everything well organized, as for intervals even in classical training they come after scales as in order to form an interval/chord you need a scale, learn basic scales and then how to harmonize a basic scale, if you understand that then modes and thier harmonization come easy

Firstly, where, exactly, did AeolianWolf mention anything about the piano???
Or are you suggesting that the guitar doesn't use notes? Theory is theory, it doesn't change from instrument to instrument. Secondly intervals come before scales, because that's what scales are built from.

You wouldn't tell someone to learn about bricks and mortar after learning to build a wall, would you?

TS, scales aren't shapes. Sure, those collections of notes form shapes on the freboard when you map out all the notes but the shape alone doesn't tell you anything, it's merely incidental...it's just how those notes happen to appear on a guitar.

As far as modes go, they aren't shapes either. In fact, because modes are related to the major scale you'll find that mode "shapes" are all exactly the same as the realtive major scale, so if you learned "mode shapes" all you'd be doing is learning the exact same thing 7 times over which is a waste of time in anyone's book.

The simple way to sum up modes is that they occur when you use the notes of the major scale over a tonal centre that isn't the major or minor tonic. To do that you need to be able to create a backing harmony that avoids those tonics, and that's hard because most western music is built around them...it's what you're expecting to hear so it's also what you'll instinctively want to create. To avoid them you need yo fisrt understand how they work, so there's no way of understanding modes or doing anything useful with them until you understand basic workings of diatonic harmony.
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#7
Quote by Daedalus42
Well that's... discouraging. I want shapes to play.


Then google can help but you won't learn anything and you won't be able to use the shapes you do find very well.

Learn theory properly.
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#8
Quote by Bad Kharmel
No, it sounds like he's looking more for guitar than classical piano don't stifle him with piano crap, there are plenty of books on jazz scales out there or you could try this site it has numerous scales and a chord calculator for harmonic chords http://jguitar.com/ it works great and has everything well organized, as for intervals even in classical training they come after scales as in order to form an interval/chord you need a scale, learn basic scales and then how to harmonize a basic scale, if you understand that then modes and thier harmonization come easy


you're an imbecile. i didn't even mention anything about the piano. throw your misconceptions aside and maybe you can learn some simple theory, too. yes, even you. so don't stifle him with idiocy and ignorance.

TS, guitar is an instrument, and to play it well requires study. i guarantee you that very few of the guitarists you look up to just play shapes. the reality is that 99% of those guitarists who only play shapes don't make it past being in a monday night band or their own bedroom. maybe they make a quick buck doing a couple of gigs every now and then, but that's about it.

the reality is, as with anything in the world, the more you know, the better off you are. if you learn shapes, that's all good and well. but what happens when you're competing for a job against a guitarist who knows theory, knows his fretboard extremely well, has a trained and skilled ear, can form chords anywhere on the neck, has great technique, and actually knows the notes in his scales? put simply, you won't have a chance, because he'll basically be you with heightened skill sets.

i know it's discouraging, but only you will suffer if you take that approach. modes will not improve your playing -- especially if you don't have the basis in theory to make heads or tails of them.

regardless of whether you want to make a living in music or just play on the side, the factors involved in improvement are the same -- they don't happen overnight. they require real effort and applied knowledge. if you're looking to become a guitar legend in the blink of an eye, you're only going to fool yourself. and that's what i'm trying to help you avoid.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
Quote by AeolianWolf
take a step back.

tell me the notes in Ab major.

if you don't know, stay away from modes. you're only going to harm yourself. start with more fundamental theory, like intervals and chords.


Wait... how quickly do I have to be able to answer?
#10
I totally agree with everyone about learning music theory; its super important BUT you've got to make sure that you enjoy when you're learning too otherwise you'll just give up. Learn more theory but I think its a great idea just to play around with scale shapes and have some fun with it as your improving your theory.

If its all just theory then you'll not stay inspired to play the guitar for very long unless you're ridiculously driven to practice.
#11
Quote by odranoel
Wait... how quickly do I have to be able to answer?


in less than 2 seconds. basically you have to master the skill to say all seven notes in the scale in one concise yelp.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
Ah, crap. I can give you the signature in that time, but not all seven notes in order. Back to the drawing board!
#13
Quote by AeolianWolf

regardless of whether you want to make a living in music or just play on the side, the factors involved in improvement are the same -- they don't happen overnight. they require real effort and applied knowledge. if you're looking to become a guitar legend in the blink of an eye, you're only going to fool yourself. and that's what i'm trying to help you avoid.


I have been playing for quite some time. I am serious about learning my instrument to the best of my ability and I am not looking to take any shortcuts along the line. What you have stated makes a lot of sense to me Aeolian Wolf. Should I start from the Music Theory section of this forum? Learn all of the notes on my guitar, intervals, why chords work etc?
#14
Jesus people, how hard is it to learn a little bit of theory? Like 7 (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, holy crap sooo many letters!?!?!) notes and the major and minor scale... that's enough to unlock the entire fretboard and most of the chords you will ever use.
#15
Quote by Daedalus42
I have been playing for quite some time. I am serious about learning my instrument to the best of my ability and I am not looking to take any shortcuts along the line. What you have stated makes a lot of sense to me Aeolian Wolf. Should I start from the Music Theory section of this forum? Learn all of the notes on my guitar, intervals, why chords work etc?



Yeah man, I would start with the major scale, then learn intervals. Chords structure works based off your root and then counting. for a blues song, for example, you start with 1 as your root, and 4 and 5 chords make up the rest.

So like if you wanted to make a blues song in the key of C, you would use C, F and G.
C=1
D
E
F=4
G=5
A
B

Also, all chords are made up of 1,3 and 5 notes... So a C chord has C, E, and G.

That should get you started bud
#16
Quote by hansome21
Yeah man, I would start with the major scale, then learn intervals. Chords structure works based off your root and then counting. for a blues song, for example, you start with 1 as your root, and 4 and 5 chords make up the rest.

So like if you wanted to make a blues song in the key of C, you would use C, F and G.
C=1
D
E
F=4
G=5
A
B

Also, all chords are made up of 1,3 and 5 notes... So a C chord has C, E, and G.

That should get you started bud



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