#1
Well it ended up not being very fun.
I was watching an "age your chrome hardware" video. and he used muriatic acid after scratching the chrome hardware with a scotchbrite pad.
first off, a scotchbrite didnt faze my bridge in the slightest, not a scratch. "hmmm" i said.

how bout steel wool. hardly.
a wire brush did the trick, and some sandpaper. i then tried Sno-Bol first, which is mostly hydrochloric acid and eats through stuff like mad - we use it to clean the bottom of our boat.
didnt do anything. then my brother says "hey, i have an unopened jar of lab grade HCl, wanna try?
"yayy okay! lets melt sh**!"

*drip drip* (and yes, i joke, but we were being careful, i had gloves and a fan. ive had enough chem classes to know not to mess around with this stuff, which was 8 molar)

anyways, didnt do a thing. melted a pop can partway, but didnt touch my bridge. its supposed so discolor stainless, and strip chrome. it did neither!

this is the bridge, its off a jackson apparently:


it has copper underneath, so i would think its chrome plated, just freakishly sturdy chrome?

oh and the goal is mostly its supposed to eat through most of it and end up a copperish color

am i just impatient? we were only out there for about a half hour. should it sit for a day or so? i dont want to come back out and find my bridge just a puddle
Last edited by xadioriderx at Jul 14, 2011,
#2
You will probably need to let it sit for awhile. Chrome is pretty tough stuff, so i'd give it a number of hours. With the chemicals being as cold as they are it is going to take a long time for it to actually start eating away at the chrome.

I've heard 8 hours to overnight before. Maybe start it in the morning one day and after 4 hours check every 30 minutes or so. If after 4 hours you see little results maybe every hour or two hours.

I've not do any sort of relicing like this, but my understanding of metallic etching and other things from a previous job says your not giving it enough time.
Last edited by XgamerGt04 at Jul 14, 2011,
#3
ah, thats kinda what i figured. the guy in the video was just saying "oh you can actually see it starting to work..."
i expected like a laser light show to start, with some 80s sci fi music playing and the bridge bubbling and fizzing and steaming or something, instead it just looked like a puddle.

i guess ill give it a go tomorrow and give it more time =D
#4
You just need to be more like me and burn through your hardware with your own skin. I have to buy my guitars with black painted hardware (and maybe gold, haven't tried that yet) because I have very acidic skin, so I burn through anything else. All my once shiny guitars now have a combination of distressed, chrome and copper finish on them hahaha.
#6
Try burning it with a gas torch first, like you would if you were burning a chrome pickup cover, and then put it in PCB etchant. I did that with a pickup cover, and this is what it turned out like;


I don't know whether burning it first will affect the results, but thats what happened for me anyway.
#7
Quote by littlephil
Try burning it with a gas torch first, like you would if you were burning a chrome pickup cover, and then put it in PCB etchant. I did that with a pickup cover, and this is what it turned out like;

I don't know whether burning it first will affect the results, but thats what happened for me anyway.


hmm in reading about pcb etching, it looks like an alternative to etchant is HCl/H202 at 1:2.
i should have some hyd. peroxide around here somewhere, ill try mixing and seeing if it makes a difference!
although i think mixing would just give me chlorine, or dilute hcl and oxygen.... bah chemistry was too long ago, ill try it anyways
#8
Chromium (the metal used for chrome plating) develops a protective oxide coating in the air. You need to scratch this off before treating with the acid otherwise nothing happens.

EDIT: Also, you need to leave it sitting in warm acid. If it's a copper bridge underneath, it won't corrode in HCl due to reduction potentials. Leave it for a few hours.
Last edited by Dan_5893 at Jul 14, 2011,