#1
So I am brand new to guitar, I just started 2 days ago and I am teaching myself! I've borrowed my brothers guitar and I am starting to do chords, I have memorized few of them but I am having some trouble with E, Em and some other more complicated chords, you see when I put my fingers in position and strum I get a-lot of dead notes,when I push harder the string will ring true, but then another string will play a dead note. also I am pushing as hard as I can, like so hard it makes me wanna cry out. I've had it checked out and there are no problems. soo it's just me...is there a certain technique to holding down the strings? do I need to have my hand in a certain position? please help!
#2
dont press too hard, just until you feel them press against the fret, and make sure your thumb is in the centre of the neck to help you have as much control as possible.
#3
Make sure you're not curling the whole palm of your hand on the neck of the guitar. Try to keep a space between the neck and the palm of your hand, while still keeping the fingers on the strings. It might feel uncomfortable at first but at least you can hit the chords. it was such a pain in the ass to hit a G chord when i first began cuz of that. Maybe that could be the problem. Work on some finger stretching exercises to get better at stretching for other chords that need it. Itll help you in the long run
#4
are you curling your fingers around, as weird as that sounds, I often find that for certain chords my fingers are virtually curled into a C shape so that the tips of my fingers are fretting the notes. This is purely my experience though other people may say different.

As for the pain, again from experience this can't really be helped your fingers and hands will be getting used to this strange new positioning and the movements associated with it, just gotta fight through. I'd have a look about on the internet for beginner warm up techniques and incorporate them into practising.
#6
thats perfectly normal, it takes some time to build up the strength in the fingers in your fretting hand till you can comfortably hold the strings down because it's not a way you usually use those muscles

the dead notes when you are pressing down hard is most likely because your fingers are muting the adjacent strings, may help to adjust the angle you are coming in from, and also moving your supporting thumb slightly may help you get better positioning

note at this point you don't need to push the strings down till they touch the fret board, only enough so they meet the fret with sufficient force to let the note ring clean

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_ATggw3ucg < might help just watched first minute will remove it in a min if its no use :p
#7
If strumming a chord is making you want to cry out, you're doing it RIGHT!

Rock on brother!
#8
Quote by funeralllllllll
thats perfectly normal, it takes some time to build up the strength in the fingers in your fretting hand till you can comfortably hold the strings down because it's not a way you usually use those muscles

the dead notes when you are pressing down hard is most likely because your fingers are muting the adjacent strings, may help to adjust the angle you are coming in from, and also moving your supporting thumb slightly may help you get better positioning

note at this point you don't need to push the strings down till they touch the fret board, only enough so they meet the fret with sufficient force to let the note ring clean

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_ATggw3ucg < might help just watched first minute will remove it in a min if its no use :p



Cheers man! this vid really helped!
#9
And when all else fails, just keep practicing chords and changing between them. No matter how crappy they sound or feel, they will get better. One day you'll be like, OHSHI, I can strum chords to Sweet Home Alabama (D C and G).
#11
Hmm it seems with this guitar, it doesn't make a sound unless I am pressing down "really" hard
#12
What guitar is it?

Persistence and a hell of a lot of practice my friend! That is the only way you are going to get better. If you follow the beginners course on the website I put a link to above you should be playing fine in no time at all. Then you can progress onto his intermediate course, he explains everything you need to know in detail. Give him a go!!
#13
try out this guy, helped me out as a beginner and I still use him now!

www.justinguitar.com

THIS!! This is how i learned, i was lazy and didn't really use his 1 minute practices, and didn't work my way through them in the order he uploaded them.

I recently started working through them and it has helped me a lot, be patient! i rushed and started to try to play riffs and it took me ages to get to a level where i was comfortable learning new things.
ALSO, DO IT IN ORDER WHEN YOU ARE LEARNING, WHEN YOU KNOW A FEW THINGS YOU'LL FIND IT LABORIOUS AND WONT ENJOY IT.

When you have your fingers on a chord, try to slowly strum, if theres a dead not readjust, and do it slowly again concentrating on the dead note, rinse and repeat until you can finger it right. Another note when i was learning, i was putting my fingers in the wrong place, try just behind the fret rather than in the middle.

Rock on brother!
#15
What everybody says above, is spot on. Research on the proper technique. I self taught myself and used alot of bad habits. It will be hard at first, but you will get use to it, just keep practicing, and you'll find some shortcuts along the ways as well. when you said, "wanna cry out." All above stated your pressing to hard, that could be the number one reason, also another one is the tips of your fingers haven't built a callous on them yet. the longer and more you practice a hard dead skin coating will result and you will be able to play longer and it won't hurt. Some use superglue on their tips when beginning, but I wouldn't recommend it one bit.
#16
be aware that putting super glue on your fingertips is roughly equivalent to a fat ugly girl trying to salvage everything with cheap nail polish
#17
Don't worry it gets easier and less painful. I'd suggest doing some lessons. I like Gibson's Learn and Master series. There are a lot of great free resources too. E, A, C, D, and G are a great place to start with chords.
#18
Actually, it may be the way the bridge is on your guitar. I bought a used one, and didn't know how to push down on strings to make notes. The strings were extremely tight, and impossible to push without almost breaking it. Turned out my bridge (metal part) wasnt flush with the body, and tge strings were abnormally tight. The guy in the music store fixed this for me and now it's good as new!