#1
Im just curious cuz I keep seeing threads on it, so im assuming its important

Thanks
IN LIFE...



IS DEATH

IN DEATH...


IS DEATH
#2
It arranges each possible key into a circle, based on the number of sharps or flats in that key signature. So, C/Am is at the top with all naturals. If you move up a fifth (to G/Em,) you add one sharp to the key signature. If you move down a fifth (or up a fourth) to F/Dm, you add one flat to the key signature. This pattern continues as you move by fifths around the circle, incrementally adding/subtracting sharps/flats. Google image it: it's all over the Internet.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#5
SOVIET , gave the answer for the music part of it .


but if you build one big enough its an intergalactic travel device called a stargate all you have
to do is turn it to which galaxy you want to travel to and walk through it .

don't tell know one i told you this its top secret stuff so ssssshhhhhhhhhh.
#6
Quote by 951
but if you build one big enough its an intergalactic travel device called a stargate all you have
to do is turn it to which galaxy you want to travel to and walk through it .


Ooooh! Thaaaaat's why they call them 'keys!' They unlock the doors of the universe!
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#7
Quote by FretboardToAsh
(Diagram)

This is one.


Soviets post kinda made sense reading it, I'm confused on relating it to that though.
IN LIFE...



IS DEATH

IN DEATH...


IS DEATH
#10
*Ahem* Back on topic... .

You've got your diagram of the Circle of Fifths. Each key has it's key signature listed. C/Am has all natural notes. Move clockwise by moving up a perfect fifth interval to add a sharp to the key signature. Move counterclockwise by moving down a perfect fifth to add a flat. Closely related keys are ones that share many notes. Notice that C:

C D E F G A B

and G:

G A B C D E F#

only differ by one note. It's very easy to move between these two keys.

The fifth chord also has a critical function in tonal harmony: it's important to know these chords relationship to each other. The Circle of Fifth also obviously teaches you how to read a key signature just by counting sharps and flats.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#11
And apart from learning "just" your keys and stuff... it also functions as a chord progression chart (once you know your keys).

Using C... to the left we find the IV chord (F) and to the right we find the V chord (G)

Still using C as the I... working to the right this time... go an extra one past G and we have D... now work out your notes in the key of C and know which chords are present in that key... and voila... we land up with a ii-V-I (Dm-G-C)...

Going now past the D we land on A... and this time we have a vi-ii-V-I (Am-Dm-G-C) progression. Going one past that, iii-vi-ii-V-I.... vii-iii-vi-ii-V-I... etc etc. You can also find some passing chords by using the note on the opposite side... Like either a bii or a bV... Substitutions come in handy... but you'll get there and everywhere else when its necessary.

If you don't quite know the notes, or if you just want a cheat sheet... going to the left of the circle you can build the quartal harmony chords.

Whichever way you want to look at it... you can definitely find a use for this circle. In whichever part you are learning in your journey... you will find a use for it. If you don't want to cheat, then don't. But its still knowledge gained no matter which way you look at it (or don't look at it ).

Hope that helped some... if you didn't understand any of it, you will when you are ready to... one day.

*****Edit: Like I said, cheat sheet. Working to the left (counter clockwise) we have the flat keys... the note next to F (Bb) IS the flat in the key. Each one gets added, etc etc.
Last edited by evolucian at Jul 15, 2011,