#1
Ebm7 / Ab7 / Dbmaj7 / Gbmaj7 / Csemidiminute (Cm7 b5 ) - the b5 is written on top / Bmaj7 / Bb7#5 - the #5 also on top


This virtual insanity by Jamiroquai. Well my teacher suggested we analyse this music as far as chord progression goes (trying to figure out the mode of the diatonic scale used here) and he said all this song includes a new aspect of theory that he didn't taught me, so I tried the basics (seeing the interval between each chord and see what's the mode) but non of the modes apply in this progression.

So, could you guys give me a hand? Does the tone shift in the song, and I have to switch between modes? Or do I have to use a different scale?
Please don't say pentatonic because that's to easy...

Thanks for reading
Strat'z
Love the Guitar
Gear:
- Ibanez SZR520
- Peavey Vypyr 30w
- Alhambra 2C Classical Guitar
- Tortex .88mm/Jazz III 1.38mm
- Elixir Nanoweb Strings (.009)
#2
For the first five chords you could use Eb dorian, then maybe B Lydian#2, from the Eb harmonic minor
I guess there's a lot you could use but that's the most obvious to me

And I'm not entirely sure what he could mean by something new, it maybe the inclusion of the Bb Dominant chord that leads back to the Eb minor or something but I'm just guessing
#3
hmmm, so what's you're saying is that for the first fixe chords I use a mode, and then for the last two the dominant chord changes to the Bb one and so a new mode applies to those two chords...

I think that's what's new, because all the song I analysed didn't have tone variations. Thanks for the help
Love the Guitar
Gear:
- Ibanez SZR520
- Peavey Vypyr 30w
- Alhambra 2C Classical Guitar
- Tortex .88mm/Jazz III 1.38mm
- Elixir Nanoweb Strings (.009)
#4
This is an interesting progression, there's a lot of movement here. I'm guessing key of Ebm?

i - IV7 - bVII - III - vi* - bVI - V7

The first four chords are a string of secondary dominants: each chord moves down a perfect fifth. Then you hit the Cm7b5 and slide downward by half-step until you hit the dominant for the cadence. I'm calling that Bmaj7 a Cbmaj7, btw.

One scale is not going to fit all at this point, you're going to have to work harder than that. Follow the chord changes the best you can. Alternating between your natural minor and melodic minor scales will suffice for the most part. The IV, vi* and V7 can all be captured from the melodic minor scale, while the i, bVII, III and bVI are from natural minor. Be careful, though, there are a few chromatic extensions here, so don't just go on auto-pilot.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#5
lol modes. no. nice try, other guy. this is pretty tonal. no modes involved.

it's in Eb minor. use Eb minor over the entire thing, taking into account the accidentals -- the C in Ab7, the Cm7b5, the Bmaj7, and the F# in Bb+7.

if you have to use mode shapes (CST), use C locrian over Cm7b5, and B major over the Bmaj7. keep in mind, however, that analyzing it this way does not make it modal. this progression is not even remotely modal.

just use Eb minor, account for accidentals, and maybe even throw a few other accidentals in where people won't expect them if you want to make things interesting.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Quote by AeolianWolf
lol modes. no. nice try, other guy. this is pretty tonal. no modes involved.


^^^ What he said.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.