#1
alright im stumped my band is now full and im so pumped. i want to write songs like guns n roses but not like them just that genre dont want to rip them off. im just wanting some advice on what type of scales and teqniques id use to write a hard rock song. how do i start. every thing i come up with isnt great please help
#2
To me, hard rock is all about the riff. Mess around with the minor pentatonic scale to come up with something that just makes you wanna break stuff when you hear it. Then write chords behind it. Voila! Hard rock.
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#3
If you wanna write like the gunners... listen to Aerosmith and write as if Aerosmith were pissed off.... cos that is, in effect, how guns n roses did it. Aside from the cover of Mama kin...

Your scales and techniques would be pretty much like any other genre (with electric)... your gain would not be full... and you'd have good sound too. Some clarity will be there then.

Wear some jewellery... get a top hat... some spandex and afterwrds get some leather pants... you know, after the first few gigs have paid for the pants...

Otherwise, get your head into blues/blues rock/rock and play it with more attitude. Thats the short cut. Better pray your vocalist can hack it... crummy voices won't work anymore. Lots of attitude. Also... to follow tradition... get your vocalist a gf who's also a model... and tell him to beat her up once in a while. Other than that... just do the bold part.
#4
Riffs, Riffs, Riffs and more Riffs.

The key to a fantastic and memorable Hard Rock song is the riff, I garuntee that as soon as I mention songs like Sweet Child O Mine, Smoke on the Water and Back in Black those guitar riffs are the first things you think of!

Try Getting your drummer to lay down a simple beat (Think AC/DC) and then just hit notes on top, you'll be surprised how quickly you can come up with something. Once you've got a riff down put a chord progression underneath it and get your bassist to play something that fits around the chords, then it's time to build lyrics. But tbh, lyics mean **** all in hard rock, just sing about how much you love your women, or driving really fast whilst swigging a bottle of Jack.
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#5
Strangely enough hard rock uses the same scales as every other genre. Obviously it's not the scales themselves that affect the sound of a song but the note choices themselves.
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#6
Quote by AlanHB
Strangely enough hard rock uses the same scales as every other genre. Obviously it's not the scales themselves that affect the sound of a song but the note choices themselves.


I always thought that the sound itself affects the sound of a song, and that tempo changes the feel of a song. I could cover a reggae song and make it sound like GNR played it, but I could also do it the other way around. While playing the same scales and notes...
"Don’t be a guitarist. Be a musician."

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#7
Im assuming you have two guitarists...
For a guns/rock feel, the main difference is they dont just play chords straight. Full chords on the down beat (the 1) but then play around the chord (like welcome to the jungle style) for the other beats. This way, you got the edgey rock feel and its rawness - then when you do play full chords like say for a chorus they'll make more impact.

Secondly make sure the bass+drums are working together excellently. They must be as tight as possible and have their own chemistry. The key to good rock songs is the ryhthm + riff, if you've got a sweet rocky riff over a tight rhythm section you're well on your way.

Scales - mostly just flat versions of the minor.

Thirdly - your vocalist must be pretty damn good at writing lyrical hooks, and having that rock front man style.

Listen to the song writing aspects of aerosmith/guns - they are both amazing at building atmosphere in songs. Guns used that chord run-down a lot, like end of welcome to the jungle, in november rain before the piano comes back in, in estranged also.
Aerosmith used harmonies to make their atmosphere, also they all had a good feel for the beat something which is overlooked quite a lot.
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Last edited by W4T3V3R at Jul 15, 2011,
#8
It always struck me that GNR used Slash almost as another vocalist, with Axl singing, then Slash 'responding' or vice versa. A pretty clear usage of call and response, a technique centuries old.

If you're looking for the key to their 'style' of music, IMNSHO there it is...
#9
Big open voiced chords, and heavy riffing involving open E and A strings. Greasy double stop pentatonic licks and screaming vibrato on lead licks!
#10
Quote by von gelb
I always thought that the sound itself affects the sound of a song, and that tempo changes the feel of a song. I could cover a reggae song and make it sound like GNR played it, but I could also do it the other way around. While playing the same scales and notes...


Slash uses the major and minor scales and the penatonic/blues scales. Eric Clapton too. Britney Spears too. Satriani too. Dixie Chicks too. Metallica too. Jonas Brothers too etc.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
Consult the red part of my sig.
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#12
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This.
If you want to play a specific genre of music that's the way to do it