#1
So I'm a noob, and have only been playing for about a month. I'm trying to learn TDG - riot at the moment.

I have my guitar tuned down to Drop C. For whatever reason when I play the G note on the 4th string (7th fret), it causes my low E (C after downtuning) to vibrate, and produce noise.

I made sure to pay special attention to see if I was accidentally hitting it with my palm or something, but I'm not. It's the strangest thing. I've tried to duplicated on other frets/strings and only that fret and string does it. It's very frustrating because it muddies the sound of the riff.

Is it some kind of sorcery I'm witnessing, or am I just hitting the resonant frequency or something, like the Tacoma Narrows Bridge lol..

#4
mute it with your thumb on your fret hand, just wrap it over so its touching the E string
#5
It's called sympathetic vibration. Some notes cause others to ring out. The reason the C rings out is it's a fifth interval from G. That's a 3:2 ratio of the frequency of the G to the C. The only simpler ratio would be the 2:1 you'd get from a note an octave up from the G. What all this nerd crap means is that when you pick the G note, it causes the body of the guitar to vibrate and those vibrations are at such a frequency as to cause the low C to resonate. You can read more about intervals and frequency relationships here Intervals. Basically the simpler the ratio the more consonant the sound and vice versa.

But in practical terms, what Shreder and Myshadow said is correct, you need to mute all your non playing strings so they don't ring out. You'll also find that as you play with louder amps on high gain, doing absolutely nothing will cause the strings to ring out and give you feedback. So you might as well get used to muting now.
#6
Well for the riff in the song, I'm already palm muting the 5th and 4th string, which I'm have trouble with because I can get the tone to sound good on one string, but the other ends up not muted enough, or muted too much. I don't know how people palm mute more than 1 string, while playing riffs correctly. You'd have to hold your palm completely perpendicular to the strings, making it a bitch to strum at the same time. When I try to do it comfortably, my hand naturally lays higher on the 4th string than 5th because of how the palm curves, so it ends up muting the string more than the 5th, sounding bad..

I can't mute it with my thumb because I'm already using fingers 1, 3 and 4 for the riff on the 5th-8th fret so it wouldn't work.

You can see it here http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/t/three_days_grace/riot_tab.htm


Quote by Legion6789
snip.


Thanks for the explanation I kind of figured that's what was happening, but it was just very odd and annoying, and for whatever reason I can't palm mute more than 1 string at a time while playing a riff.
Last edited by Backfat at Jul 15, 2011,
#7
Palm muting is only one way to mute. You have to use your left hand too. So if you're doing a power chord on the E, A and D strings, your index finger should be lightly touching the G, B and e strings to keep them from sounding out. That's how guys like Pete Townshend can do those huge windmill strums and still only have the notes he wants to ring out. It's definitely not because he's so accurate at right hand picking that he only hits the two strings he wants.

As for your palm muting problem, without seeing it (maybe make a video?), it's hard to give you advice. For me the knife edge of my palm rests across the strings I'm palm muting, almost, but not completely perpendicular to the strings. By moving it towards the bridge the notes ring out more. Moving it towards the neck causes it to be much more abrupt. Try looking for a video on youtube about palm muting. I'm sure there's tons of them that can show you really good technique.
#8
Quote by adambauman31
mute it with your thumb on your fret hand, just wrap it over so its touching the E string



Why would you do that when you can mute it with any other finger or even better, your picking hand?


Muting with your thumb should be a last resort because it greatly hinders your fretting hand's mobility.
#9
why would muting with your thumb limit hand mobility? surely if anything it would increase it as then you can thumb fret really easily
#10
Quote by teh_goon
why would muting with your thumb limit hand mobility? surely if anything it would increase it as then you can thumb fret really easily


Ok so do that... now fret a stretching lick like Paul Gilbert does all the time.

Mute with your picking hand, it allows your fretting hand much more freedom to move and stretch and fret with good technique all the while. Thumb fretting is a very specific skill that should only be a consideration when you actually need it, at all other times you should default to having your technique be as efficient as possible.
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#11
Quote by teh_goon
why would muting with your thumb limit hand mobility? surely if anything it would increase it as then you can thumb fret really easily



Your fretting hand reach decreases and you can't pivot off your thumb. You'll end up becoming like a rusty slide rule with enough tension to squash ten orphans.
#12
I suggest when you pick start off parallel to the top e string and as you work down you move you rotate your hand more vertically downwards each time, that's what i do and it seems to work.
#13
I tend to pick, then mute the 6th / 5th strings with my picking hands thumb. Just after i pick i rotate my hand slightly and lay the side of my thumb against them.

I do this a lot it seems.. i just never consciously noticed.

Edit after playing for a minute, i don't really pick, then mute. there done almost simultaneously.
Last edited by ToXyN at Jul 17, 2011,
#15
Resonance.. never seen that in a guitar before.. but it is theorically true.. as vibrations cause sounds.. sounds can also cause vibrations.. You just have to mute the string and it will be fine..
#16
Quote by NightPhoenix
Resonance.. never seen that in a guitar before.. but it is theorically true.. as vibrations cause sounds.. sounds can also cause vibrations.. You just have to mute the string and it will be fine..



It's very true. It's more obvious when your guitar's more in tune with itself. It extends across to other instruments too. I could be playing an E on a piano and if a guitar's close enough, the E on that will start to ring too and so will certain harmonics on the other strings. It may not be audible unless you actually get really close but the related strings definitely start to vibrate at the related pitches.