#1
How do you make a 7th chord? I want to know the theory behind it.
Also what are "sus" chords? How do I make those aswell?


Thanks,
#2
A seventh chord is made using your root and a third, fifth and seventh. There are many kinds of seventh chords, but there are mainly three types you should be aware of:

Dominant 7th: 1 - 3 -5 - b7
Major 7th: 1 - 3 - 5 - 7
Minor 7th: 1 - b3 - 5 - b7

"sus" stands for suspended. In a suspended chord, the third interval of the chord is replaced by either a second or a fourth.

sus2: 1 - 2 - 5
sus4: 1 - 4 - 5

The 4th/2nd is often a chord tone from the previous chord that has been held over--or 'suspended'--into the current chord. The suspension is resolved when the suspended note resolves to the third as per usual. Example:

E  -  D#  - D#
C# - (C#) - B
A  -  G#  - G#

A - G#sus4 - G#m

This is how they got their name, but you don't have to use them like that. Modern music often uses sus chords as a power chord or triad replacement. Remember that sus chords are neither major nor minor.
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#3
I know very little theory, but I think I understand the theory behind 7th chords and sus chords.

7th chords are created by adding the seventh note of the scale to the chord. For example, in an E major chord, it can be made into a seventh chord by adding a D note.

As for sus chords, or suspended chords, it is were a certain note of a chord is raised by half a step, or a semitone. For example, a Dsus4 chord is created by raising the 4th note of the scale by a semitone, namely an F# is raised to a G.

I hope this helps, but as I've said, theory is not my strong point, somebody else may be able to clarify my points
#4
Quote by AF7ERLIF3
I know very little theory, but I think I understand the theory behind 7th chords and sus chords.

7th chords are created by adding the seventh note of the scale to the chord. For example, in an E major chord, it can be made into a seventh chord by adding a D note.

As for sus chords, or suspended chords, it is were a certain note of a chord is raised by half a step, or a semitone. For example, a Dsus4 chord is created by raising the 4th note of the scale by a semitone, namely an F# is raised to a G.

I hope this helps, but as I've said, theory is not my strong point, somebody else may be able to clarify my points


you're very wrong. 7th chords are diatonic, they are constructed by harmonizing scales, but the 7th itself may be major or minor depending on what scale degree you're working off of for the root of the chord, what key you're in etc. If I were to play an EMaj in the key of AMaj, E would be the V of A, which would in this case be I. The V chord in a major scale will always be V7/Vdom, which means it has a flat/minor 7th despite being a major chord.

soviet_ska correctly explained sus chords. Further, Dsus4 is not taken by raising any note by anything, and F# is D's major third, not its 4th. As soviet_ska said suspended chords "suspend" the third (be it major or minor) of any given chord, which is often useful for leading into/out of other chords in a progression. Because the chords have no major/minor quality with the absence of a third, they're often used in place of power chords (which also lack a third) in modern music, which gives an interesting sound.

Thus, Dsus4 is the result of taking DMaj - D F# A or Dmin - D F A and substituting the 4th for the 3rd. ergo your new chord is D-G-A.
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