#1
Hey hope someone can help me here. I have searched and looked for a thread on this, couldn't find one specifically that helped.

So I have set up my guitar and it's all intonated fine with new strings, but for some reason some of the notes at various frets come up usually sharp below the octave, and read slightly flat over the octave. Is this normal? Or just the quality of my guitar (lowish)?
#2
What type of bridge do you have?
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#3
could be bad frets, especially if by, "lowish" you are speaking of quality. If the frets weren't placed precisely enough it could definitely throw off the intonation at those spots.
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#4
A guitar will never be intonated perfectly. There are things like true tempered necks, fanned frets, and compensated nuts that help. I think true tempered necks are the only solution that will give you perfect intonation across the neck.
#5
It's normal, although anything extreme might be a problem. It's just how guitars are built, you will never physically be able to perfectly intonate every single note on the guitar unless you physically change the guitar (true tempered necks for example).
#6
Thanks people, I figured as much.

I was also wondering whether this had any relation to some notes sounding flat in a cover I tried to-do, even though they were reading fine on my tuner. Maybe just how original guitarist played it. (Posted about this in the "Need halp? - Technique Analysis" thread)

Quote by Arch1119
What type of bridge do you have?

"Floyd Rose-licensed", on an 80s budget-ish range.

Quote by Lt.DanHasLegs
could be bad frets, especially if by, "lowish" you are speaking of quality. If the frets weren't placed precisely enough it could definitely throw off the intonation at those spots.

I don't know what one considers "precisely enough" but, I had it looked at by a pro in a guitar shop and he said it played well, and that all the frets were good.
#7
Is this the case for all the strings, or just one or a couple? If it's all of them it sounds like the neck has a little too much backbow to it. You would have to press the string further down in the middle (below the 12th) and it would cause it to be a little sharp, and after the 12th it would be too shallow causing it to be flat of the intended pitch.

Just my two cents (no pun intended)
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[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#8
Quote by Flux'D
Is this the case for all the strings, or just one or a couple?

Seems all, hard to get an accurate reading I guess. I just checked again with everything tuned up, all the strings were reading slightly sharp off the 1st fret.... then as you go up around the 5th/6th .... some notes were reading sharp, some flat, some dead on
#9
That could be a nut problem then, 95% of production guitars have nuts that weren't cut quite right for the instrument. If they're sharp on the first few frets then the nut is too tall or the slots weren't cut quite deep enough.

Somebody posted a chart on UG a few days ago from Earvana showing how off each fretted note is on both 25.5" and 24.75" scale guitars, but I can't find it anywhere.. The fretted notes will never be dead perfect due to simple physics. Specifically how off are you talking?

You could also be bending the string slightly when you fret it, just a thought.
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#10
Quote by Jonashred
it's all intonated fine with new strings, but for some reason


New strings take a bit to settle. Redoing the intonation after a day or two might solve the problem. If not, then a refretting is in order. You might get some satisfaction from filing one side or the other of the problem frets to shift the top over a bit, but there is not much change to be gained by that.
#11
Quote by Jonashred
I was also wondering whether this had any relation to some notes sounding flat in a cover I tried to-do, even though they were reading fine on my tuner.


Absolutely. On newer recordings the guitars are being auto-tuned. If a guitarist is running all over the neck and every single note is dead-on then a computer probably helped. The upside is that you can clean up your own messy leads with Garageband for $99!