#1
SO I want to buy one, and being that the finish I wan't has EMG's, and almost all of them do, Its obviously geared towards metal. But every demo I've ever seen the person has to play stupid Drop B Metalcore riffs (and always is using some kind of shitty amp, to boot). I do like metal, but more of the standard tuning over dropped (Metallica FTW). Can it do other things?

Basically, can this thing do blues?
Where's Waldo?
#2
Most of the "genre-setting" tone comes from the amp and not the pickups, and as such I've found EMGs to be capable of most things to a reasonable extent. Most of my experience is with SD Blackouts, which I can vouch for being completely capable of any genre with the proper setup, and EMGs from what time I've spent with them should be similar.

Try something with EMGs (should be EASY to find...) through a lower gain amp and see if you like it, the sound will not change much with different woods or body shape.
#3
If you're not absolutely sure you want EMGs for metal or something. Dont get them, You wont be happy AT ALL bro.

They suck dick without piles of distortion or gain.
My Omen 6 pickups sound better clean than those pieces of garbage
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#4
Quote by AJDrac
Most of the "genre-setting" tone comes from the amp and not the pickups, and as such I've found EMGs to be capable of most things to a reasonable extent. Most of my experience is with SD Blackouts, which I can vouch for being completely capable of any genre with the proper setup, and EMGs from what time I've spent with them should be similar.


+1. EMG's are really versatile, because they don't color your tone at all. Technically, they're far more versatile than any passive could ever be.

They are a bit compressed sounding though, and they really let your playing shine through moreso than most passive pickups.

I can say with first hand experience that EMG's can work for any genre. Because really, your tone is going to come from your amp, and your style is going to come from your fingers. You play what you want to play, and EMG's will play with you, provided you know how to work an EQ, and your gear is meant for what you want to play. Passives tend to almost fight against you, because of the way they are automatically colored. Obviously this really depends on the situation, and a lot of the time that color is essential to really achieve certain tones, but I'm just saying, there's nothing you can't do with them.
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(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

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#5
yea man emg's are pretty versatile get em. i get wat you mean, ive heard "esp is only for metal".
i bought an epi lp custom with active emg's used. i play mostly classic rock, gnr, sabbath, hendrix etc, and i also like newer metal.

its basically just a matter of turning down the volume knob and messing with your amp settings and you can get bluesy tones.

in my opinion passive hot pickups would be better than the emg's, but i still dig the emg's....id rather have hot pickups that sound good with high gain and ok with everything else than pickups that i cant play metal on.
#7
Lol yes the EC-1000 does fine in standard tuning as well. Especially for Metallica. =D

Can't say much about the blues though, don't really play much of that style...
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#8
Quote by Offworld92
+1. EMG's are really versatile, because they don't color your tone at all. Technically, they're far more versatile than any passive could ever be.


I disagree. EMGs have a very distinct tone. I do think they can be versatile, but I don't think they're great in non-high gain applications. I am a fan of EMG.. but for versatility, I'd choose something like a Duncan JB or Gibson 57 Classic.

I think you can order Eclipses with Duncans.. could be wrong. I'm almost positive you used to be able to.
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#9
EMGs color tone, just not as much as passives since the output is high due to the preamp rather than the couls and magnets. That said, any pickup can do any genre as long as you have the right amp and know how to use the EQ and you guitar's volume and tone controls.
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#10
If you don't think EMGs can handle softer music go listen to bootlegs of Prince at the Montreaux Jazz Festival. He played a legendary set spanning classic rock, hard rock pop, funk, and jazz. And he did it all on a Strat with EMGs. Here's a YouTube clip.
#11
Quote by Offworld92
+1. EMG's are really versatile, because they don't color your tone at all. Technically, they're far more versatile than any passive could ever be.

They are a bit compressed sounding though, and they really let your playing shine through moreso than most passive pickups.

I can say with first hand experience that EMG's can work for any genre. Because really, your tone is going to come from your amp, and your style is going to come from your fingers. You play what you want to play, and EMG's will play with you, provided you know how to work an EQ, and your gear is meant for what you want to play. Passives tend to almost fight against you, because of the way they are automatically colored. Obviously this really depends on the situation, and a lot of the time that color is essential to really achieve certain tones, but I'm just saying, there's nothing you can't do with them.


i think you're gonna get a fair amount of flack for some of these statements. i can't agree that EMGs let your playing shine through. i can't even say i understand your point totally on this. i find that actives tend to sound the same and you really have to work hard to get your personal tone to come thru with them. since when is gear "meant for what you play"? while some gear may make it easier to play certain types of music that doesn't change the fact that you can use anything you want. ted nugent used a byrdland thru fender dual showmans for hard rock, neither was "meant" for this. for that matter a Les Paul wasn't "meant for rock at all either. the list can go on. if EMGs work for you then awesome but they may not be for everyone (but what is) and i'm not sure they deliver as you say either.
#12
Thanks for all the responses guys. I think now I can buy it and not have to worry about regretting it later.
Where's Waldo?
#13
The neck pickup (60) cleans up really well, and if you want kind of a dirtier blues sound you can always use a light crunch setting on your amp and use the 81 in the bridge to get a slightly overdriven sound. You should be fine.
#14
I can't recall where I heard it so someone correct me if I'm wrong but weren't active pickups originally intended more for jazz? I've got three guitars with varying combinations of emgs, they have no problems doing things besides metal and they clean up just fine with my setup.
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#15
Quote by monwobobbo
i think you're gonna get a fair amount of flack for some of these statements. i can't agree that EMGs let your playing shine through. i can't even say i understand your point totally on this. i find that actives tend to sound the same and you really have to work hard to get your personal tone to come thru with them. since when is gear "meant for what you play"? while some gear may make it easier to play certain types of music that doesn't change the fact that you can use anything you want. ted nugent used a byrdland thru fender dual showmans for hard rock, neither was "meant" for this. for that matter a Les Paul wasn't "meant for rock at all either. the list can go on. if EMGs work for you then awesome but they may not be for everyone (but what is) and i'm not sure they deliver as you say either.


Well, what I meant is that EMG's show your mistakes more than passives do, because they have so much clarity. It doesn't have to do with tone, I was just highlighting some aspects for the TS.

I've had experiences with the exact opposite. Assuming you're using a good amp, and not just using tons of gain (which is what a lot of people instinctively do when they are using EMG's), you can definitely hear nuances in tone, even when the only thing different between guitars is neck wood. They don't have as much character as as passives, but they're definitely not a magic tone killer.

All I meant by that is that you're not using a Fender or a Vox for death metal. Just generally using gear suited for what you're playing. Of course you can use any guitar for any type of music.

I'm not trying to say the EMG's are the end all (well, they are for me, but of course most people are going to have different needs and tastes), I was just trying to illustrate that they can do any style. The more headroom your amp has, the more versatility you're bound to get out of them. Even if you don't have a lot of headroom, your guitar's volume can control your output quite a bit.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#16
Quote by Offworld92
Well, what I meant is that EMG's show your mistakes more than passives do, because they have so much clarity. It doesn't have to do with tone, I was just highlighting some aspects for the TS.

I've had experiences with the exact opposite. Assuming you're using a good amp, and not just using tons of gain (which is what a lot of people instinctively do when they are using EMG's), you can definitely hear nuances in tone, even when the only thing different between guitars is neck wood. They don't have as much character as as passives, but they're definitely not a magic tone killer.

All I meant by that is that you're not using a Fender or a Vox for death metal. Just generally using gear suited for what you're playing. Of course you can use any guitar for any type of music.

I'm not trying to say the EMG's are the end all (well, they are for me, but of course most people are going to have different needs and tastes), I was just trying to illustrate that they can do any style. The more headroom your amp has, the more versatility you're bound to get out of them. Even if you don't have a lot of headroom, your guitar's volume can control your output quite a bit.


it's cool i just couldn't resist ripping on you for the way you put it.
#17
EMGs were designed for cleans IIRC, so they should serve you in othe place than metal territory.
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#19
Quote by monwobobbo
it's cool i just couldn't resist ripping on you for the way you put it.


Yeah, but clarifying is always good. Don't want to come off as a jerk or anything.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#20
Look EMG 60-81-85 are all good pick-ups.(which is what im assuming is going to be in your ec-1000.) but if you actually want a LEGIT blues tone (or any other non metal tone for that matter) then no, they can't do it.
my friend had that same guitar(same pick ups.) and he sold it after a few weeks because it wasn't versatile at all. most of the people on here say their versatile pick-ups but if you actually attempt to achieve a SERIOUS tone besides metal it's just not gonna happen.

bottom line: Only buy it if you are strictly going to do metal.
#21
The problem with EMGs is they're so compressed. You don't get that touch sensitivity usually found in passives that's prevalent in blues. They work for jazz and metal because that uniformity is beneficial to the genre. For everything between jazz and metal, EMGs fall short of passives. There's a reason why people who play those genres don't use EMGs. If you want versatility, you're better off with passives. They work well for more applications.
#23
EMG I find to be very versatile, the only problem I have with them some days is that they seem a bit too agrerssivly voiced somedays to me
#24
Versatility is all good on a budget, but I realized a long time ago that the "jack-of-all-trades, master-at-none" comes into play when you try to make a guitar truly versatile. I'm sure you can dial in some close tones with the right amp and pedals, but I think some tones are influenced by the wood+hardware+pickups formula.

So in the end, I find a tone I want, and I get a guitar that I will like that is suited for it. I already know theirs no way I could get the Jimi Hendrix tone I love from my Gibson with P90s, or my Ibanez. And even when you talk about humbucker vs humbucker, the Dimarzio pickups in my Ibby will be a poor substitute for a Led Zepplin sound.

I don't know if I'm making any sense here, I'm tired, so I will just shut up now.
#25
Ok, I have another question about the guitar, but I can't seem to find the answer on google (probably just searching the wrong thing, but w/e).

I know that older models of this guitar came with 81/85 pickups, and the new ones have 81/60. I would like to have the 81/60 combo, but I cant tell which ones they are, as they all look the same. I also know that they changed the LTD logo on top from what looked like some chicken-scratch handwriting to the cursive style MOP inlay. Is there any correlation to when these changed?
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#26
Quote by chadreed32
Ok, I have another question about the guitar, but I can't seem to find the answer on google (probably just searching the wrong thing, but w/e).

I know that older models of this guitar came with 81/85 pickups, and the new ones have 81/60. I would like to have the 81/60 combo, but I cant tell which ones they are, as they all look the same. I also know that they changed the LTD logo on top from what looked like some chicken-scratch handwriting to the cursive style MOP inlay. Is there any correlation to when these changed?


Generally, the older the model, the better quality you're going to get when it comes to LTD. There's a blog in my profile regarding this if you're interested. I'm not exactly sure which logo styles coincide with which year, but in the serial number, there will be a letter, and then the first 2 numbers after that should be the year.

As for EMG's, you can tell what model you're getting (on the standard models anyway) by the logo on the pickup. The 81 is silver, the 85 is gold, and the 60 is a dark silver/bluish color.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X