#1
I was thinking about redoing my JEM (instead of studying, ofc) and I learnt how "easy" it was to stick a thin veneer on it.


Then I thought about what colours I would stain it in. And then i stumbled upon this:

http://www.ibanezrules.com/images/used_index/jpm90th_6/IMG_7286.JPG

Would it be possible to do that with regular water based wood dye/stain? would tape stop the stain from transpiring past the lines?

or do you think they used tinted lacquers? how did they keep it level?
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#3
The UGer Lumberjack stained his neck laminates on his latest build and made some very nice, sharp lines.
#4
ethan, by light on the dye, do you mean dilute or just small amounts at a time?

and Pikka bird ty i'll search him.
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
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My JEM Build
#5
^I think he means small amounts, preferable with a barely damp sponge, or if you spray it, use high pressure and low volume.
Last edited by Pikka Bird at Jul 15, 2011,
#6
By light on the dye, I mean don't slop it on there, apply it to a rag, get rid of any excess, and buff it onto the guitar, to avoid over application. Just, apply it in very light thin coats, to avoid any possibility of getting to much on there and it bleeding under the tape.
#8
yeh, but you suck :p

I'd be wearing about dying with painters tape tbh though, probably take months of practice to get it right
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#9
one thing you can do if youre set on trying it is not get the wood damp at ALL before applying stain. that will help it not run. but it will also make the wood absorb the stain and dry rapidly, which makes it uneven very easily
#10
p.s. I didn't really mean it when I said you suck

have a present to make up...
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
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#11
Quote by xadioriderx
i fully fully disagree. i uesd painters tape and the dye seeped straight under it. i wouldnt suggest it
After the first layer of dye has dried, tape up the areas where you want to add the darker dye, lightly clearcoat the exposed areas. Once the clearcoat is dry, remove the tape, then apply the darker dye. No seepage.

#13
Quote by Ippon
After the first layer of dye has dried, tape up the areas where you want to add the darker dye, lightly clearcoat the exposed areas. Once the clearcoat is dry, remove the tape, then apply the darker dye. No seepage.




ty for the pic,

but

a) if you clearcoat it, does that really stop the dye from seeping horizontally? i mean i was under the impression that it's not because the brush touches the top of the wood, but the dye moves from where you apply it to the areas adjacent to it.

b) if you clearcoat one portion and not the other, isn't it likely that the final finish will be highly uneven?


EDIT,

c) Would this also work with sanding sealer? clear sanding sealer would be easier to level after the uneven spraying, but would it stop the seepage?
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
Last edited by seek_&_destroy at Jul 15, 2011,