#1
Sup guys

Recently bought myself a condenser mic (EA BM-1) and started recording some vocals

Iv never recorded vocals before and i was just looking for some tips, main things i want to know about . . .

1-How can i get a consistent volume without having to alter my position from the mic all the time / without having to edit the track volume a bunch (if thats possible)

2-i bought the mic to record other bands also, some of which will be screaming/shouting ect. I had a friend try out the mic a lay down some scream tracks but it just sounded really weak and like he was on the other side of the room, how can i boost the sound/get a bigger thicker deeper sounding scream with the mic?

3-Anything else i need to know . . . ?

I know about pop filters and setting the mic to pick up low end resonance off the chest ect

just looking for tone tips above everything else

Cheers!
#2
1- You record the track, then add Compression to the voc track.

2 - Are you saying that the mic has a low volume ? can you elaborate more on that point ? Did you check if you switched the mic on HIGH instead of LOW ?
Normally you wouldn't have a volume problem if everything is plugged well.


3- Record the voc. Eq it by removing lower frequencies, and boosting higher ones for voc presence. If you feel that the voc is a bit dry, add a bit of delay ( but just a bit ). For more stereo presence, stereo the delay, or double track.

Use autotune when voc can't hit pitches well.
The symphonizer
Last edited by Sympho at Jul 15, 2011,
#3
Quote by Sympho


2 - Are you saying that the mic has a low volume ? can you elaborate more on that point ? Did you check if you switched the mic on HIGH instead of LOW ?
Normally you wouldn't have a volume problem if everything is plugged well.



The mic has no High or Low setting, and its not that it was quiet, just that it sounded really dull.

It wasnt him because i can say that in the room whilst recording he sounded really good, but it just sounded like he was at a distance instead of right infront of the mic (he was around 20-30 cm away)
#4
2) What kind of preamp are you using? A preamp will help warm up your sound and add the needed gain. Also, try multi-tracking the vocals or adding a slight delay to thicken up the vocals.

Try to improve your vocal chain:
Good singer - well treated room - good microphone - preamp
#5
Running the mic into a UX2 and an X3

Not the greatest thing in the world but iv heard a LOT better results from the Ux2 than what i was getting
#6
Have the singer be roughly a fist's length (or 4 fingers) away from the mic with a pop filter in between. If you're still getting too many plosives, angle the mic down slightly. Set the gain on the preamp as high as you can get without clipping on the loudest part of the song. If it's a very dynamic song vocally, you might want to record loud and quiet parts separately so you can get decent gain on both.

For volume, add some compression. That helps some, and I recommend using a few steps of it rather than smashing it with just one. It's easier to keep the life if you use a few compressors just a little bit vs. one a lot. You'll also need to do some vocal riding (automation). Yeah it's a pain, but zoom way in and every word or syllable that's louder or quieter than the rest, bump it up or down a little bit. Of course you want to keep some dynamics, so use your decision making skills. It really doesn't take THAT long, and once you dive in it's pretty easy going.

If you dont want to take the time to do any step, it'll cost you in the end. Recording and mixing is all about patience. If you don't have it, you wont get as good results.

That's how I was taught to do vocals. Feel free to experiment and do what works best for you.