#1
Jimi Hendrix for the most part kind of plays a sloppy guitar. It's almost as though he's soloing the entire time, this is kind of the way I see his songs because there's always so many variations or just different parts to the song. What I'm wondering isn't how to do all of that (I'm fairly certain I know how to let loose on my own)

What I'm wondering is how the bassist and the drummer were able to make such a supportive rhythm for each song, it seems really difficult to me. Can anyone explain to me what they did? Because if I just kind of solo in a rhythmy way I can't seem to match it or get it right with the drums or the bass. Thanks in advance, sorry for the inconvenience.
Fair enough.
#2
LSD

No seriously I guess that he was the focal centre of his band (how could it be either way?), so the bassist and the drummer worked their ass to follow his way of playing.
#3
Quote by electroMakumba
LSD



This.
Gig Rig:

Schecter Hellraiser V-1
Crate BV120H
B-52 LS 4x12 cabinet
BBE Rackmount Sonic Max
Boss ME-50 Pedalboard
Digital Reference 2505 Wireless

I don't like BTBAM. Sue Me.

PLUR

My Solo Project
#4
The bassist played similar lines to Jimi. But Jimi's rhythm playing set him apart from alot of other guitarists. Learn his rhythm style and it will stand out. The bassist and drummer only support his playing which was ridiculously strong.

He still would have done an outstanding job without them.
#5
Quote by AfroRockerMike
Because if I just kind of solo in a rhythmy way I can't seem to match it or get it right with the drums or the bass.


Well that's because you aint Johnny Hendricks. There's a reason why these people are lauded as some of the greatest musicians ever.

There wasn't anyone like that before him and there hasn't been anyone since really.

There are people who come close to that kind of technique, SRV and Frusciante come to mind, but again they are immense musicians.
#6
Quote by Duv
Well that's because you aint Johnny Hendricks. There's a reason why these people are lauded as some of the greatest musicians ever.

There wasn't anyone like that before him and there hasn't been anyone since really.

There are people who come close to that kind of technique, SRV and Frusciante come to mind, but again they are immense musicians.



This as well!
#7
Hendrix's technique of soloing rhythm patterns worked because while he would add lots of little licks and variations, he still stuck to the same chord progression. The bass and the drum can just keep playing the same pattern, it's the guitarists job to keep his licks in time.

This is all my opinion, of course.
Last edited by Frank_Black at Jul 15, 2011,
#8
Quote by AfroRockerMike
Jimi Hendrix for the most part kind of plays a sloppy guitar. It's almost as though he's soloing the entire time, this is kind of the way I see his songs because there's always so many variations or just different parts to the song. What I'm wondering isn't how to do all of that (I'm fairly certain I know how to let loose on my own)

What I'm wondering is how the bassist and the drummer were able to make such a supportive rhythm for each song, it seems really difficult to me. Can anyone explain to me what they did? Because if I just kind of solo in a rhythmy way I can't seem to match it or get it right with the drums or the bass. Thanks in advance, sorry for the inconvenience.

Most of what Hendrix did was electrify blues and marry blues with rock and roll. Most of the rhythms that you'll hear are variations on pretty standard blues rhythms. I suspect that the players he enlisted to gig and record with him were already very familiar with blues and rock and roll and they simply fell into a groove.

Jimmy's music was very organic and it's tough to get his rhythms just right because a lot of it was improvised variation on standard rhythms. If you listen to several live recordings, those variations take place at different times and in different ways more often than not.
#9
To be honest, I'm not the biggest Hendrix fan. I think he's a bit over rated. He's a great classics musician/rock star but I'm a modern guy so I'll be inspired by what makes ME feel great, not what made others feel great. But anyway, when I try to record and do as I please with it, Hendrix is the only one who does it in such a formulated scattered way if you get what I mean. Frusciante only used guitars when he was sounding like Hendrix so it's easy for me to go along with that but sometimes I want drums in what I play too!

This may get a lot of hate but I don't particularly care, being a musician never meant caring about other people's thoughts.
Fair enough.
#10
Quote by Frank_Black
Hendrix's technique of soloing rhythm patterns worked because while he would add lots of little licks and variations, he still stuck to the same chord progression. The bass and the drum can just keep playing the same pattern, it's the guitarists job to keep his licks in time.

This is all my opinion, of course.

This is exactly it, alot of his licks were following the basic chord progression so the bassist and drummer never had to really worry.
Gear
- Synyster Schecter Standard
- Peavey Vyper 15

I'm currently using Cubase 5 for any recording purposes.
#11
noel redding played root note bass a lot, keeping to fairly simple patterns but with quite a smooth style, he played with a pick and basically played bass like guitar. mitch was a very good drummer, i think he came from the jazz scene so maybe if you had your drummer look at that.

they weren't always just supporting hendrix thou, a song like fire's pratically a drum solo with light guitar on top