#1
First off, I have a Ludwig Accent Combo Wine Red 5-Piece drum kit. It has 12", 13", and 16" Toms, a 22" bass, and a 14" Snare. The cymbals are Paiste PST3's, 16" crash, 20" ride, 14" Hats, and a Zildjian ZHT 10" China Splash.

I only have 1 mic, and it is medium quality. I can record with it, but it is very REAL sounding, if you know what I mean.

Now, my brother has given me tips on what I want, and he seems to know what he's talking about, but I want to know what would be recommended in my situation. I record in a small room, with hardwood floors and nothing to stop the sound from echoing.

Oh, and by my equipment, you can tell my budget is very low ($100-$200)
Minecraft: Sonic
League of Legends: CinoSRelliK


Currently Playing/listening to/Reading:


Kerbal Space Program,
Binding of Isaac
Opeth - Orchid
S. by Doug Dorst
The Martian by Andy Weir
Last edited by S0n1c '97 at Jul 15, 2011,
#2
What kind of interface are you using? What mic do you have?

With that budget it's going to be hard to get something of decent quality to fully mic the kit. There are cheap packages out there, but I'd stay away from the ones in your price range...

Your best bet might be to just add to your collection one or two mics at a time. Depending on the mic you have now, you might want to look around for a good used kick mic and use the one you have now for an overhead. If your mic is decent on a snare, I'd look for some overheads next. With that setup you can definitely get a respectable recording and after that it's just polishing it off with tom mics and hat and ride mics and all those fun ones.
#3
shure's drum mic kit is pretty good
whooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Quote by EJD
Reminds me of that drunkard who ran out of beer... he was so desperate, he drank furniture polish.

He came to a horrible end... but a beautiful finish.
#4
You could also try looking at a condenser mic. I've seen an entire drum kit recorded with a decent quality condenser. In that price range, you're looking at a Behringer B-1, B-2 or similar. As long as you understand the limitations, those two mics are fairly decent for the price.
#5
Okay. Definitely something to look at.

Another question. I have heard that you can mic that size kit with 2 mics. I don't want to do that, as I would have to capture highs and lows on both mics, but how many can I get away with?
Minecraft: Sonic
League of Legends: CinoSRelliK


Currently Playing/listening to/Reading:


Kerbal Space Program,
Binding of Isaac
Opeth - Orchid
S. by Doug Dorst
The Martian by Andy Weir
#6
Check out this link. Here's one of the mics I have. It's the Neumann TLM-102, which is a condenser. This one is slightly outside of your budget, but one of the demos on this page is this mic being used in a stereo pair. I really think you could get away with just one. Since it's a condenser, like the Behringer B-1, or B-2, they really hear quite well.

http://www.soundpure.com/p/neumann-tlm-102-microphone/2381
#7
A little out of range? That thing costs more than my kit!!!
lulz
Any other condensers of high quality that I could get away with?
Minecraft: Sonic
League of Legends: CinoSRelliK


Currently Playing/listening to/Reading:


Kerbal Space Program,
Binding of Isaac
Opeth - Orchid
S. by Doug Dorst
The Martian by Andy Weir
#8
AKG perception 220's in a Glynn Johns mic technique. won't give you a super modern sound, but it is a fairly honest representation of the drum kit as it is in the room.
#9
Quote by S0n1c '97
A little out of range? That thing costs more than my kit!!!
lulz
Any other condensers of high quality that I could get away with?



Sorry about that. I was really only pointing out that mic as an example of something you do with cheaper mics. The only cheaper mic I'm familiar with is the Behringer B-1. It's a $100 condenser that isn't all that bad. It does have some limitations, but as long as you work around them, you can achieve some nice results. The B-1 I own has a little noise as you crank up the gain. It's not noticeable until you really crank it up. The TLM-102 is totally silent, no matter how high the gain. There are some other inexpensive condensers out there. Check out the gear reviews on Musician's Friend. For $200, you could buy a pair of B-1s and do quite well.
#10
Hmm... 200$ is in my price range. I don't know whether to trust you (Drummer) or my brother (Guitarist)... lulz
Minecraft: Sonic
League of Legends: CinoSRelliK


Currently Playing/listening to/Reading:


Kerbal Space Program,
Binding of Isaac
Opeth - Orchid
S. by Doug Dorst
The Martian by Andy Weir
#11
Well what tips has your brother given you? If we disagree with something specific we can explain why and you can make a more educated decision. If we don't know, it's all just guessing.

An important question to ask yourself is what you want your recording quality to be like now and in the future. If you get a few cheap mics now, it might bring instant gratification and a little better sound, but in the long run you'll end up spending more money replacing those mics to get better ones. If you can hang with workable but less than perfect quality right now, and save for another decent mic or two, you'll have saved a lot of money in the future.