#1
So I finally am getting myself a drum kit after years of wanting too, however, my experience with guitar has really told me to learn it right the first time. I've researched both matched grip and the french style but the drummers I know all have different opinions. I just want to know which is the best to start learning with. If it makes any difference I would like to be a fairly capable metal drummer some day but I don't want to be limited to that style of playing at all, in fact, I think punk/rock drums sound cooler.
#2
IMO matched, and if you want to play metal even more so, unless you're Nick Pierce haha. The motions are a lot easier to pick up. Overall I would say use an American grip, which is in between French and German grip and basically combines finger and wrist control. Your wrist will be titled at about 45 degrees if implementing American properly.

I think matched is the better style overall for ergonomics, even though you do get better rebound in traditional grip.
#3
That's what I've gotten from a lot of people. It feels the most... idk natural I guess as well.
#4
Indeed. What I've heard about traditional is that it's easier to lead with either hand as your brain thinks of each hand as a separate entity (because they are), but I'm naturally right handed/play with matched grip and frequently lead with either hand.

I still think trad is worth pursuing for some as it's good to have options, though it also emphasizes crossing over to play the hi-hats, which IMO is a pointless and obsolete concept.
#5
Basically it's ok if it's matched grip or trad grip but if you're just starting do matched grip first.

Matched grip = less rebound power than trad but it's efficient and ergonomics and easy to get when beginning

Trad grip = lots of rebound but it's a bit iffy at when starting out but gets better after a lot of practice (at least to me, I just suck at it I guess)

either way as long as it doesn't hurt your wrist, it is correct
#6
Quote by Steve08
I still think trad is worth pursuing for some as it's good to have options, though it also emphasizes crossing over to play the hi-hats, which IMO is a pointless and obsolete concept.

How is it a pointless and obsolete concept?
#7
Quote by doomtron
How is it a pointless and obsolete concept?
Plainly, it seems unnatural and uncomfortable to me. I think you should play things on the left side of the kit with the left hand and things on the right side with the right hand (like Gary Chester's "territorial rights" concept basically). You have a left hand which is far closer to the hi-hat as compared to the right. Why not play it with that hand?

Also, crossover forces both hands to match dynamics-- if you wish to play powerfully with the left hand then you must also lift your right hand accordingly. It doesn't facilitate something like medium volume on the hi-hats combined with loud volume on the snare, and IMO backbeats should always be fat.

I also think from a technical standpoint it offers more freedom and a greater number options, and also allows your left hand lead to develop at the same pace as the right.

If I had to sum it up, I just think open handed is a better, more logical way of playing the hi-hats and indeed the entire drumset.
#8
Quote by Steve08
Plainly, it seems unnatural and uncomfortable to me. I think you should play things on the left side of the kit with the left hand and things on the right side with the right hand (like Gary Chester's "territorial rights" concept basically). You have a left hand which is far closer to the hi-hat as compared to the right. Why not play it with that hand?

I'm right handed, and right handed time keeping just makes much more sense to me, and allows me to use less complicated sticking patterns to transition into fills, which allows me to be more efficient. I do play the hats with the left hand occasionally, but mainly when my right hand is doing something else (like playing the ride).
Quote by Steve08
Also, crossover forces both hands to match dynamics-- if you wish to play powerfully with the left hand then you must also lift your right hand accordingly. It doesn't facilitate something like medium volume on the hi-hats combined with loud volume on the snare, and IMO backbeats should always be fat.

I don't agree at all. I can play with different dynamics with both hands quite easily.

Quote by Steve08
I also think from a technical standpoint it offers more freedom and a greater number options, and also allows your left hand lead to develop at the same pace as the right.

I think it depends on your style. I feel more limited playing open handed.

Quote by Steve08
If I had to sum it up, I just think open handed is a better, more logical way of playing the hi-hats and indeed the entire drumset.

I guess I just don't really see the benefits. I've never seen any drummer (who wasn't left handed) playing open-handed IRL, and the only drummer I listen to who I can think of off the top of my head who plays open handed is Shawn Drover, who I don't consider a bad drummer, but he's just kind of average to me, and everything he plays can be played crossing over. I guess it's just not for me?
#9
Quote by gothblade
Basically it's ok if it's matched grip or trad grip but if you're just starting do matched grip first.

Matched grip = less rebound power than trad but it's efficient and ergonomics and easy to get when beginning

Trad grip = lots of rebound but it's a bit iffy at when starting out but gets better after a lot of practice (at least to me, I just suck at it I guess)

either way as long as it doesn't hurt your wrist, it is correct


It feels like there's more rebound, but you use your fingers to control the stick. In terms of stick control in a technical manner, then I'd say traditional is better. In terms of a comfortable and natural feel, then matched is possibly the more suited of the two.

I use both traditional and french (I think it's french) depending on what I play. It's good to have options, even if you're not good at doing it, so long as you can play comfortably and keep time, then it's good to use it
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#12
Quote by Steve08
I'll send you a PM as this discussion probably isn't suited for a thread on stick grips, heh.

Fair enough I was just curious as to why you thought that.

Anyway, I should probably actually contribute something on topic haha

I learned to play matched grip originally, and I'm in the process of mastering traditional grip. I do agree that it provides more rebound. As for more finger control, I actually find that most of my stick control comes from the web between my thumb and index finger when using traditional grip. My fingers act as more of a guide. Maybe that's just the way I was taught.

As for which is better, I think they each have benefits for different styles. Traditional is great for things like Jazz or lighter forms of music, but for something like Funk or most forms of Rock or Metal I feel that matched is definitely more suitable, especially if rimshots are needed, because left-hand rimshots can be kind of difficult using Traditional.

EDIT:
Quote by AmericanZero13
+1
Last edited by doomtron at Jul 18, 2011,
#13
I play traditional and try to play metal, rock, and funk. I feel like a boss when I play fills correctly.

I feel as if I get so much power with my left hand while playing traditional. Blasts are definitely hard, but it's still fun!

A great metal drummer that plays traditional is Jason Costa of All That Remains. Look up live videos. He's pretty clean.

I would learn matched first. Learn rudiments and stuff. Then switch from matched to traditional. Like everything else in life, there is a right way (American grip), the wrong way (German grip), and the French way.
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#14
by french do you mean traditional? french grip is basically a loose match grip that many people have different criticisms about (for example, many consider it to simply be proper match grip technique, and therefore should not have a different name).

you're probably thinking of traditional grip, where your left handplays with the stick between the ring and middle finger...very hard to explain typing. its definitely worth learning, i know it only improved my drumming. as match vs. traditional when playing in general/with a band...its definitely whatever feels comfortable to you.